Water Themed Crafts Part 4

Welcome to healthy water themed crafts part 4! These are crafts that encourage us to drink more water and that help us appreciate clean rivers, lakes, and oceans.

Parts 1, 2, and 3 covered crafts ranging from crochet to polymer clay, woodworking to scrapbooking, and chainmaille to knitting. Today, in this fourth of six posts, I’m covering needlepoint and cross stitch, baking, glassblowing, basketweaving, and sewing.
The Penny Wishing Well

 [The Penny Wishing Well by Paula Steele via Flickr]

Water Themed Crafts in Needlepoint and Cross Stitch

Let me start with this piece by Diane Herrmann entitled “Walking the Water’s Edge” on BridgesMathArt. This combines two of my favorite things, needlepoint and geekery, into a beautiful result. From the post: “To be mathematically precise, we work with the sum of two trigonometric curves to show the action of water as it sloshes over itself in the push to get on the shore.” Love this!

 

healthy water crafts - dragonfly pillowIn a less mathematical vein is this dragonfly cushion kit available on TheStitchery. The 4.5 to the inch gauge would be a bit large for me, but it does have some very pretty watery effects.

 

 

 

healthy water crafts - water dragon cross stitch patternThen I found this Water Dragon pattern available on Flowers2Flowers. Accompanying the Chinese symbol for water, he’s a rather handsome water beast.

 

 

 

 

Needlepoint piece / WMMW BLUE / for cushion cover top or wall decor etc.Finally is this amazing wave interference pattern by Haruhi Okubo of Cresus-Parpi. This is one of the projects from Cresus-Parpi that first got my jaw-dropping attention. If you would like to read more about her works, I featured an interview with Haruhi in July 2013. The original needlepoint project has been sold, but I wonder if Haruhi would consider selling the pattern?

Water Themed Crafts in Baking

I fully realize that the terms “healthy,” “water,” and “baking” don’t necessarily complement each other. However, when it comes to appreciating clean water, there certainly are many examples of this in baked goods. I’ll start with this amazing water cooler bottle cake by YenersCakes in Australia. How fun is this?

 

 

Next up are these clever water bottle cookies by CristinsCookies, made as part of a massive order of seven different bicycling-themed cookies (sunglasses, jersey, bicycle, etc.) for one of her customers.

 

 

This lush scene from BubbleandSweet is really more of a party planning post, but you won’t find a party more water-themed than this. Here’s additional tutorial information about the pearly cake and macaron tower, and the very cute mermaid cookies.

 

 

 

 

cake wavesCraftsy has this great tutorial on how to make wave ruffles from fondant. On the same post, they have a link to this post full of beach-themed cakes. CreativeCelebrations also has this post featuring, among others, numerous examples of cakes with shell and beach themes. Lots of inspiration out there!

 

 

 

 

Waves & Beachy Heart Cookies | Make Me Cake MeI’ll finish up with some helpful tutorials for some gorgeous wavey and beachy decorated cookies. First up are the instructions for these Summer Lovin’ Beachy Heart Cookies by MakeMeCake. Cute!

 

 

 

Beach cookieNext is a link to a video tutorial by Sweetambs for these beach cookies (love the drawing in the sand),

 

 

 

Wave and Surfboard Cookies - by Glorious Treatsand lastly is this totally gnarly DIY for wave cookies (along with some excellent surfboards and swim trunks) by GloriousTreats. Honestly, I’d feel guilty eating any of these cookies I’ve featured as they’re just too gorgeous (but I bet they’re absolutely delicious)!

 

Water Themed Crafts in Glasswork

Let’s start with this simple and pretty tutorial for this beachy glass gem art by Shannon at MadiganMade. It’s inexpensive, sparkly, and in her own words “…this sucker was HEAVY,” but she loves it!

 

 

 

healthy water crafts - lampwork bead with wave patternThere is an ebook tutorial for this gorgeous lampwork ocean scene bead from BeadsandBotanicals via ArtFire.

 

 

 

 

healthy water crafts - lampwork bead with wave pattern tutorialFrom Victoria’sGlassworks on the LampworkEtc site is a DIY on how to create this type of beautiful wavey beads.

 

 

 

Making-Waves-with-Glass-image2BeingBesidetheSeaside shares some information on how to make waves and bubbles in fused glass,

 

 

 

kim merriman fused glass waveand KimMerrimanArt has these examples of colorful waves in fused glass for some inspiration.

 

 

 

Here’s a quick video on YouTube from ExpertVillage on how to create waves in blown glass, and there are numerous sources of inspiration for wave shapes and patterns in blown glass. First is this example by NewHopeStainedGlass on their Etsy store.

 

 

 

 

 

Next is this beautiful “Coastal Bowl” by Wind’sEdgeStudio.

 

 

 

 

Iridescent Hand Blown Glass Bottle VaseThen there is this iridescent wave pattern vase by Josh Fradis in his Etsy store,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

and also this amber wave vase by Carl Radke via ArtfulHome.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Glass wave sculpture by Mario CeroliThis glass wave piece (via CluboftheWaves) by Mario Ceroli is unique and beautiful,

 

 

Chihulybut when it comes to the expression of water and wave forms in blown glass, the ultimate artist may be Dale Chihuly. A Flickr search on “Chihuly” produces some beautiful photos, and his website has all his details, including his exhibition schedule. If you’ve ever been to the Bellagio Hotel in Las Vegas or seen the movie Ocean’s 11, his enormous work “Fiori di Como” adorns the ceiling of the lobby.

Water Themed Crafts in Basketweaving

healthy water crafts - chumash native american water basketI was curious about the existence of watertight baskets and I found this conversation on the topic on Yuku. Not surprisingly, it seems they’re difficult to weave, and require maintenance to keep their water-tightness, if not pitch and/or seeds to effectively plug all of the tiny holes. The book Survival Skills of Native California seems to have more definitive information on the topic

 

 

 

 

 

 

healthy water crafts - large wave basket lampshadesI’m happy to say there are some beautiful examples of waves in basket weaving. First are these large scale pieces made by Lin Lovekin as lampshades for a restaurant.

 

 

Wave basketNext is this amazing wave basket piece featured on SmithsonianMag.com.  It was part of an exhibit featuring the basket weaving art of African slaves who were brought to the American South.

 

healthy water crafts - pakistan wave basketThis simple but elegant wave basket is from Pakistan and available on RedPeacockImports,

 

 

 

 

 

healthy water crafts - wave basketand among other of her wavey designs is this fun piece by Sheila Wray on her site, BeyondtheBasicBasket.

Water Themed Crafts in Sewing

healthy water crafts - sewn water bottle carrierTo encourage us to drink more water, Jennifer Stern at CraftStylish has this detailed tutorial to sew an embroidered water bottle carrier. I like this tutorial as she describes how to size the carrier for a bottle you already own.

 

 

 

 

 

 

healthy water crafts - sewn layered wave skirtThen what girl wouldn’t want this very cool skirt! This great tutorial by Julie Martin of ZozoBugBaby via PetitePurls has measurements for different sizes and ways to reuse fabrics into this pretty project.

 

 

SewMamaSew featured a DIY by Alisa Burke from her book Sew Wild for this water inspired mobile for a baby’s room. I love the unstructured nature of the project, and how it is so bright and colorful while being different from most of the super-cutesy things made for new babies.

 

 

 

 

 

This lovely sea waves pillow is a tutorial from Amy Friend on the SizzixBlog. They share the colors of the gorgeous Kona Cottons they used, and although they used the Sizzix die cutter, I’m sure similar shapes could be achieved other ways (and how did she get her points to match up so perfectly?).

 

Pin cushion tutorialI adore this larger scale “pin pillow” by Lori at TheInboxJaunt. It’s a great way to use up tiny scraps and make a colorful and very functional pincushion. I’d love to make one someday!

 

 

I’ve found two tutorials for wavey bags. The first is the (depressingly named but very pretty) Wave Goodbye tote on WeddingDressBlue. A nice touch is at the bottom of the post – there are photos of completed projects by her readers.

 

 

 

 

 

healthy water crafts - wave tucked preppy handbagThe next tutorial is this bright Wave Tucked Preppy Handbag at Sew4Home. The fabrics used in this project are great and I bet there are some other combinations that would be equally fabulous.

 

 

 

 

OCEAN BUTTONS... 5 beach stone button tagsFor the details, these Ocean Buttons by MadeforFun on their Etsy shop would be a perfect way to finish off a water-themed project. Each button is roughly one inch in diameter – making it perfect for a bag or an ocean inspired sweater.

 

 

hd-mosaic_wave_col_3Finally, I had the good luck to find this fun ribbon, based on a mosaic tile wave pattern, on BelloModo. This could be used to beautiful effect in so many projects!

 

 

 

That completes this fourth post on healthy water crafts, covering needlepoint and cross stitch, baking, glass work, basket weaving, and sewing. Is there anything in these crafty categories that you would like to add to the comments?

Make sure you have checked out the previous posts of this series! Part 1 featured crochet, woodworking, quilling, lace and tatting, weaving and tapestry, and mosaic tilePart 2 featured polymer clay, embroidery, scrapbooking, metalworking, ceramics, and stained glassPart 3 covered healthy water crafts in knitting, paint, beadwork, chainmaille, leatherwork, and gardening.

And stay tuned for the next TWO installments, featuring quilting, felt, jewelry, soapmaking, and a whole lot more!

[Update: Here are Part 5 and Part 6 in the series!]

ACrafty Interview with David Tedin

Welcome to today’s ACrafty Interview with David Tedin: carpenter, baker, basket weaver, woodworker, cook, and gardener. He is of Scandinavian heritage but has the soul of a Tuscan chef, and his biscotti is so good that he brings it to Italy (seriously!).

acrafty interview with david tedin basket collectionWhen did you start crafting? DT: To answer that, I would have to decide what is crafting and what is just making stuff. I can remember, before I even started school, nailing two pieces of wood together and nailing a sardine can on the back to make a truck. That would be making stuff. Because you needed something or thought it would be neat.

My family made gifts for Christmas, birthdays, and other gift-giving occasions.  So I guess it started at home at an early age.

seashell jewelry collectionWhat crafts have you tried and what is your current favorite? DT: Stenciling designs on towels and pillowcases, and making shell jewelry. This was something I enjoyed doing. There were kits, with packets of different shapes and colors of seashells along with instructions. You could make earrings, pendants, pins, and brooches. I haven’t seen these kits in over 50 years.

I’ve also tried whittling, carving, hide tanning and leatherwork, model making (many of these were kits, but some went with whittling and carving), drawing, pottery, basket weaving, gardening, cooking, baking, and woodworking.

acrafty interview with david tedin tableWoodworking is probably my current favorite since I now have the time, place, tools and equipment to do what I want. My woodworking now is mostly small furniture, tables, jewelry boxes, cutting boards, toys, and small projects that other people come up with for me to do.

 

 

Have you ever started a project without a pattern or plan? DT: Many times. It is part of the learning process. At times the results are amazing. Other times it comes out; what is that? Or I don’t want to do that again.

What craft project are you most proud of? DT: Here again, what is crafting?  I am a retired carpenter and a craftsman by trade.

With the help of my wife Rita, we designed and built a 7,000 sq. ft. two story, solar heated home. The only things that were contracted were excavation, concrete delivery, renting a crane to set trusses, hooking up the electrical panel, and installing cable TV. Along with some help from friends pouring concrete and setting trusses, we did the rest. It took 8 years. but it was a great way to retire. Even though I had been in construction for over 20 years I learned a lot. One benefit of many years of crafting, it teaches you how to pay attention to detail.

acrafty interview with david tedin basket from fishing suppliesHas a craft project ever challenged you in an unexpected way? DT: Yes. After watching a lady weaving baskets I thought that would be fun to try. After finally finding a book with instructions on basket weaving, finding the material (reed) in Southeast Alaska was not going to be easy. The basket I chose was coil with a rod core and interlocking stitches. I was a long way from the Southwest where this type of basket is made, so I went to the fishing supply store and bought rope for the core and fishing line (the type used for halibut hooks). I use this basket today when I do weaving demonstrations. It is so strong you can stand on it.

How has crafting affected your character? DT: It has made me more…

  • Patient. When you are working with small pieces, messing up one part can ruin the whole project. This has carried over in my work. When you have to concentrate on getting the small pieces right, then paying attention to detail becomes much easier when working with big pieces in construction. I do not like to do the same job over because I didn’t pay attention.
  • acrafty interview with david tedin kneelerGrateful. For those people who have put up with the mess that I am sure to make with a project, and for the ability to do whatever I may choose.
  • Organized. With any project, I like to have the materials ready ahead of time. It is easy to lose interest if you have to go searching for what you need next.
  • Supportive. If someone shows an interest in something you are doing it is nice to be able to teach another how it is done or just talk about what you are doing. It is also enjoyable to work along side someone who is doing the same thing you are, sharing ideas and methods.
  • Adventurous. Sometimes trying something new may make the stomach a little queasy. It is not only can I do this but can I do it right. It is rather exciting to try something new, but you have to want to do it. I often times had that feeling when I would start a new project in my work.
  • Persistent. This is something I am still working on. Some projects have taken a long time to complete. I suppose it depends on my interest level, sometimes I can get distracted with something that looks more interesting.
  • Proactive. This for me goes with being organized. Anticipating what will be needed and how it should be done. It also worked very well for me in my work.
  • Independent.  At times it is fun to work with others, sharing ideas and different ways to do things; at other times it is nice to be able to work alone. I find it easier to concentrate and things tend to go more smoothly. Most of all the rest of the world goes away.
  • acrafty interview with david tedin basket with pink and purpleDiverse.  Many different things interest me. Seeing something and wanting to try it without the fear of not being able to is great. If I mess it up or quickly lose interest I don’t do it again. The best part is finding things you like and continue doing it.
  • Imaginative. After working with other people’s plans, designs, recipes, etc. and learning the basics I find it easier to adapt or do it my way with good results.
  • Observant. Hopefully I have learned to see what others like and dislike; and how others accomplish some of the same things I am doing.
  • Consistent. I do some things over and over the same way because other ways I’ve tried just aren’t as good. Baking biscotti is one example. With woodworking there is always something new to learn; even though you are making the same initial design. Basket making, and pottery take years of doing to make each one the same.
  • Brave. Just do it.
  • Calm. I’ve found that if I lose my cool or try to hurry what I am doing I usually mess it up.

acrafty interview with david tedin basketCan you share a story about how your crafting has affected others? DT: I’ve taught and encouraged others who have shown an interest in what I am doing to go ahead and try it. I also have taught classes and done demonstrations to the public. I hope that when our kids were growing up my crafts made an impression on them.

 

 

 

acrafty interview with david tedin storage bench

What crafty goodness do you have coming up in the future? Why is it appealing to you? DT: Harvesting and selling the garlic we have raised, canning produce for the coming year. Making spice cabinets for the church bazaar; I’ve never made one before and a friend of ours wanted one modified to fit her spice jars. A half round table, because the plan I have looks interesting. A drop leaf table, a challenge to me because I have never done rule hinges. Basket weaving and baking comes with the winter months.

A special thanks to David for taking the time to do this interview. When he sent his responses back to me he said “I found out more about myself than I thought I would. Things I hadn’t thought about in years and things that I take for granted in daily life.” I always learn something from these interviews and it’s even more special when the interviewee gains from the process as well.

Dave happens to be my uncle (his wife Rita is my aunt), and their son, Chris Tedin, was featured in a previous ACrafty Interview. Another of their sons, Mark Tedin, is an artist probably best known for his continued work on Magic: The Gathering and other fantasy projects.

If you would like to contact David with questions about his crafts (or his outstanding biscotti), please contact me and I’ll be happy to relay the message…

Would you like to be a part of the ACrafty interview series? Just contact me! You might also be interested in reading some more ACrafty Interviews with multi-crafter Diane from CraftyPodquilter Betty Busbycross stitcher Katie Kutthroatembroiderer Sasha of What. No Mints?, jeweler Ron Buhler, and embroiderer Ellen of Schindermania!.

Hexagon Crafts Part 4

Welcome to Hexagon Crafts Part 4! This series on hexagon crafts should really be titled HEXIE MADNESS! Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3 of the series covered all kids of crafts: from quilting to quilling, jewelry to crochet, origami to leatherwork and everything in between. Today we’re covering hexagon crafts ranging from needlework to making a pendant lamp and lots more!

Hexagon sewing machine

 [Hexagon Sewing Machine by Crafty Dogma via Flickr – (what a beautiful machine!)] 

Hexagon Crafts in Cross Stitch, Needlepoint, and Embroidery

StitchyPuff - Cross Stitch Chart PDFDragonflylotus Designs offers this cheerful hexipuff pattern.

 

 

 

 

 

hexagon crafts part 4 - hexagon shaped plastic canvas boxThis pattern for a hexagonal sewing box (or anything box, really) made from plastic canvas is interesting. While this is particular example is pretty, the colors and accents used here don’t intrigue me much. I’m sure that with the right colors this could be made into something really gorgeous!

 

 

Hexagon Stitch ArtMollie of WildOlive created this project which combines fabric hexies with colorful and freeform stitching for a fantastic decorative result.

 

 

embroidery samplerOn FeatheredNestStudio, Jennet posted about her very pretty hexagon embroidery sampler. I like the simplicity and her use of colors and fun stitches!

 

 

Embroidery Pattern Aqua Snowflake Christmas Winter PDFOf course, snowflakes ARE hexagons. I just love these colorful and beautiful embroidery snowflake patterns by Carina at PolkaandBloom.

 

 

 

 

Just two weeks ago, Becca at Ladyface Blog posted this tutorial for embroidering hexagons on tea towels. Very cute!

 

 

Hexagon Crafts in Gardening

hexagon crafts part 4 - hexagon raised bed gardenI wish I had the space for this compact hexagonal raised bed garden! This post by Alexdlp at the Instructables site gives layout suggestions and construction details. The keyhole element to facilitate maintenance is both practical and attractive.

 

 

Quilted Kitchen Garden 01This article at PhoenixPermaCulture doesn’t contain construction instructions, but you can see how they used “salvaged and scrap 2×4 and 4×4 lumber pieced together to form 4 1/2′ across hexagons.” And when you’re gardening for sustenance these hexies are surely a great way to go.

 

Hexagon Crafts in Baking and Cake Decorating

hexagon crafts part 4 - hexagon chocolate wedding cake with flowersOf course, there are many, many hexagonal shaped wedding cakes. Here are two beautiful decorated examples: This Chocolate Garden Wedding Cake by MaisieFantaisie,

 

 

 

 

 

and this henna-themed cake by Natalie at ChandelierCakes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then I found this cake, decorated with colorful fondant hexies, by Maggie at VibranceandChaos.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rainbow hexagon cookies inspired by crocheted afghans!My jaw dropped when I saw these amazing cookies, inspired by crocheted afghans, by Zoe at WhippedBakeshop. WANT. I wonder what flavors are available…

 

 

 

 

Next up are these decorated cookies by EmmyJeanCookieMachine, based on the hexie shaped board game “The Settlers of Catan.” Fun!

 

 

 

 

Bee CookiesI found this recipe for honeycomb stained glass cookies at FancyFlours, with their adorable sugar bees. I’d like to see these cookies made with other flavors and colors of sugar candy as well!

 

Hexagon Crafts Pendant Lamp

PVC-Pendant-Black-After-2This tutorial for a DIY pendant lamp by Amanda at OurHumbleAbode is pretty good! It’s not perfect, but for a first attempt and at the inexpensive price it’s hard to beat. I wonder how it’s held up over time…

 

Hexagon Crafts in Paint

SolidWoodBench has this great tutorial for making a cute hexie stenciled door mat,

 

 

 

 

and Morgan at PepperDesignBlog, as part of a Pinterest challenge, made this planter box with fabu painted hexie accents!

 

 

 

This tutorial from Jesse at NineRed not only shows how to paint some awesome hexies, it also has great information about refinishing any piece of furniture, even if it’s ugly 70’s plastic!

 

 

 

Honeycomb Hexagon Wall @ Vintage Revivals-2This photo and DIY from VintageRevivals left me nearly speechless. HOW COOL IS THIS WALL? Actually, the whole room is very cool, but the hexies and the graduating shades of color – stunning! I imagine that the biggest pain was building the hexagonal wood latticework. Do you think an equally cool latticework could be accomplished using washi tape?

That gorgeous wall wraps Hexagon Crafts Part 4. Is there anything else in these crafty categories (paint, cross stitch, embroidery, baking, lamp making, and gardening) that you would like to add in the comments?

Make sure you’ve checked out the quilting, leatherwork, scrapbooking, weaving, and jewelry featured in Part 1, the crochet, felt, lace and tatting, polymer clay, origami, and popsicle sticks in Part 2, and the sewing, pottery, knitting, quilling, woodworking, plastic, and stained glass in Part 3!

ACrafty Interview with Katie Kutthroat

Welcome to today’s ACrafty Interview with Katie Kutthroat. She’s heavily tattooed, always honest, and an occasionally NSFW cross stitcher and embroiderer. If you watch the Emmy winning HBO series Girls, you may recognize some of her pieces that were used on set.

ACrafty Interview - Katie Kutthroat belly dance embroideryWhen did you start crafting? KK: I grew up around crafting. My mother’s aunts, my great aunts, were big into crafting… painting, quilting, embroidery, cross-stitch, I grew up with these things around me. I guess I really learned and appreciated embroidery and cross-stitch when I was in high school. I definitely gifted friends and boyfriends homemade goods ranging from towels to homemade soap, that was about the time I learned the passion that comes with making things with your hands.

 

 

ACrafty Interview - Katie Kutthroat don't make me poison your food cross stitchWhat crafts have you tried and what is your current favorite? KK: I have tried knitting, cross-stitch, embroidery, jewelry making, soap making, painting, sewing, cake decorating… my favorites would be cross-stitch, embroidery and jewelry making. But I am in the middle of a break from culinary school, due to finances. Once I am back on the saddle I plan on continuing with a pastry certificate, I really want to decorate cakes for a living. I enjoy making people happy and smile and ultimately that is what I want to do for the rest of my life.

 

ACrafty Interview - Katie Kutthroat wanna fly cross stitchWhat craft project are you most proud of? KK: I did this 8×10 cross-stitch in the sampler style with a quote from Toni Morrison, “Wanna Fly? You Gotta Give Up The Shit That Weighs You Down.” It really has a positive and healthy message to it, what holds us back we truly must give up to succeed.

 

 

 

 

ACrafty Interview - Katie Kutthroat anchorman quote cross stitchWhat is your most popular or best selling project? KK: My most popular items would be any Anchorman quote or anything with a Girls reference.

 

 

 

 

ACrafty Interview - Katie Kutthroat ain't nobody got time for that cross stitchWhat is the silliest question you’ve ever received about your craft (aside from this one)? KK: Probably if I really talk in quotes and slang like my stitching.. and to my family’s dismay the answer is, yes! HA!

 

 

ACrafty Interview - Katie Kutthroat your ruin may gain embroideryHas a craft or craft project ever challenged you in an unexpected way? KK: It is funny cause sometimes the pieces I think will be a simple task I tend to make more complicated. This is more true with embroidery, but I really love bringing depth and texture to them. Sometimes this tends to be a task more challenging than my skill.

 

 

ACrafty Interview - Katie Kutthroat 500 days of summer quote cross stitchHow has crafting affected your character? KK: It has definitely brought me a calm… It has made me more patient definitely and in moments of stress or anguish I find it comforting and relaxing. It is sorta my zen.

 

 

ACrafty Interview - Katie Kutthroat bless this MF home cross stitchCan you share a story about how your crafting has affected others? KK: It is truly amazing some of the stories I have heard, from people giving gifts with quotes from relatives past to their family members or just someone learning how to cross-stitch because they wanted to do one of my patterns themselves. It is all more rewarding than I ever thought it would have been when I started my Etsy shop 5 years ago!

What crafty goodness do you have coming up in the future? Why is it appealing to you? KK: I honestly am not sure what my next new thing is, I have lists all over the place (i.e. my cell phone, computer, scraps of paper) with ideas written on them. I tend to just go with what feels right at that moment, it really is like therapy stitching. I do plan on taking more pastry classes as soon as possible though! 🙂

A special thanks to Katie for participating in this ACrafty Interview. She was one of the first people I ever contacted on Twitter (along with WhateverJames). She recently has had some attention with her pieces being featured on the HBO show Girls, and I just couldn’t be happier for her! Best of luck finishing out your culinary degree, Katie – I can’t wait to see your first Anchorman themed pastry…

You can follow Katie’s adventures on Etsy, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram, Tumblr, and Facebook!

Would you like to be a part of this ACrafty interview series? Just contact me! You might also be interested in reading some more ACrafty Interviews with cross stitcher WhateverJamesmulti-crafter Diane from CraftyPodknitter Apockylypse, and quilter Betty Busby!

1939 Movie Crafts

For me, movies and crafts go hand in hand. Not only do I get inspirations for craft projects from movies, I can craft while watching movies. I also learn and try to improve myself from movies – see how to act in some situations and how NOT to act in some situations.

1939 was arguably the best year ever for movies. Dark Victory, Gone With the Wind, Goodbye Mr. Chips, Gunga Din, Love Affair, Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, Ninotchka, Of Mice and Men, Stagecoach, The Wizard of Oz, and Wuthering Heights (among others) all were released in 1939.

I’m a big fan of Cary Grant, and now that I have a DVR, I’ve been catching up on his movies that I haven’t seen yet. A couple of weeks ago, I saw Only Angels Have Wings for the first time and I just loved it (here’s a good review). Looking it up online, I discovered it was released in 1939 as well. So I’ve been wondering “are there any 1939 movie crafts out there?” The answer is a resounding YES! Take a look:

 

 

 

 

I found this charming movie quilt by Joan Bjork that features three 1939 movie characters – Bette Davis in Dark Victory, Judy Garland in The Wizard of Oz, and Vivian Leigh in Gone With the Wind. The quilt also features six other amazing actresses, Debbie Reynolds, Audrey Hepburn, Marilyn Monroe, Julie Andrews, Elizabeth Taylor, and Ingrid Bergman, in some of their most famous roles.

Then I found, via craftgossip.com, this adorable felt Scarlett and Rhett pair by DeriDolls. She really did a wonderful job on the details for this epic couple from Gone With the Wind.

 

 

 

Ehow.com has a tutorial on how parents and kids can make a stagecoach from cardboard boxes and craft paper, while hobbylinc.com offers this 1848 stagecoach scale model kit.

 

 

 

 

Heathcliff from Wuthering Heights Cross Stitch Pattern Sunday Avery created this Heathcliff pattern, complete with torrential Wuthering Heights rain, available at her Etsy shop, BookPilgrim.

 

 

 

 

 

Geeky Cross Stitch KIT There's No Place Like HomeOf all these movies, the most popular and most crafted has to be The Wizard of Oz. There’s a TON of crafty goodness inspired by the movie. This cross stitch kit by Leslie at DisorderlyStitches puts a cool contemporary twist on the popular quote, as does this Wizard of Oz lineup pattern by PixelPowerDesign.

 

 

These DIY cupcake toppers from SweetPaul gave me a good chuckle, and Craftsy offers this Technicolor knitting pattern called Dorothy’s Dream.

 

 

 

 

 

Finally, I really like this inexpensive, simple, and colorful rainbow project for young kids at MomsCraftySpace. So cheery, and streamers are always fun!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Are any of the 1939 movies on your list of favorites? Have you ever made a crafty project inspired by one of these movies?

Blog Every Day in May Days 12 – 19

Further topics for Rosalilium’s Blog Every Day in May Project! Today I’m covering collecting, go green, food, pampering, walk to work, best friends, and traditions.

Collecting

Fabric stash or dog bed?I’m actively trying NOT to collect anything anymore. My biggest weaknesses are movies and fabric. I’m one of those people who can watch movies over and over again. So I see a great deal on a DVD I know I will enjoy and it’s tough to resist. And there’s nothing better than finding a beautiful cotton print and buying a half yard of it. [Note: this is not my dog or fabric stash, but it’s adorable and I can totally see my dog doing this]

With that in mind, my husband and I are tackling some big projects to get rid of STUFF! DVD cases – chucked out! CDs – digitized and jewel cases chucked out! Old videotapes and cassette tapes – digitized and chucked out! Up next – the challenge of sorting, filtering, organizing, and digitizing old photos. That’s a big one.

Too much stuff can just weigh you down, physically and emotionally. Patricia Herr at GirlsOnTheWay puts it best: “You don’t need all the stuff you possess, and having all that stuff only leads you to believe you need even more stuff. Before you know it, you’re spending money to maintain the piles of stuff you don’t need, and then you’re spending energy coveting the shinier stuff your neighbors own (but don’t need).” Read her whole post – it’s worth your time.

Go Green

Solar PanelsThere’s a few small things we do – no paper plates, walking when we can. There’s a few small things I’d like to look into – replacing paper towels with washable rags, some vertical gardening on our patio. Recycling is handled by our city. However, our biggest green contribution is the house. We remodeled it 10 years ago and this puppy is tight! We’ve got solar panels on the roof that generate most of our electricity. The windows are all double paned and the walls and ceiling are heavily insulated. We’ve got high efficiency appliances (I LOVE my clothes washer) and low water use fixtures. And for the States, our house is pretty small – about 1300 sq. ft. That means much less space to heat, cool, furnish, and keep clean. Yes.

Food Glorious Food

Mexican Chocolate Cream Pie RecipeI’m so lucky – my husband does all the cooking. He likes to cook, whereas I’m more of a forager if left to my own devices. But I do like to bake. My favorite things to bake right now are a Grapefruit Pound Cake and a Mexican Chocolate Cream Pie. They’re both from Cooking Light magazine and thus lower calorie than regular recipes for pound cake and chocolate pie.

Do I have a favorite food? Not really. I will say, though, that when we were living in Europe, I sure did miss having Mexican food once in a while. Whenever we would come back to the States for a visit, one of our first stops would be to go get a shredded beef taco and some good salsa.

Pampering

yogaTo me, there’s nothing better than a serious deep-tissue massage by someone who really knows what they’re doing.  Second to that is a really good yoga session where you KNOW that the next day, you’re going to feel it. Fabulous.

Walk to Work

I’m so happy that I work at home. I’ve got a desk that is surrounded by windows, and the view is always good.

Best Friends

I am fortunate enough to have some really good friends and family, and sometimes it makes me a bit sad that very few of them live near me. But I move around a lot and they move around a lot, so that’s the way it is. I am grateful for my friends because even if we only talk a few times a year, we know we would be there for each other if necessary. We don’t over-analyze and get defensive if someone doesn’t email us back right away – it’s OK – people are busy – we understand that.

Favorite Tradition

Interview Q7My husband and I don’t have too many traditions. As we’ve moved around, we’ve had to create new events on the go.  From Thanksgiving to Christmas, though, I really do enjoy being home, putting up the tree, baking, wrapping presents and the like. And I will always make my Mom’s recipe for apple pie. [Note: This is my Kitchen-Aid mixer. His name is Bruce]