Willy Wonka Cross Stitch Pattern

This Willy Wonka cross stitch pattern is now available in my Etsy shop!willy wonka cross stitch pattern so much time and so little to do

This pattern features one of the famous quotes from Gene Wilder’s character in the 1971 version of the movie. As the visitors to the factory have just walked in the door and are removing their coats, Willy says: “So much time and so little to see. Wait a minute. Strike that. Reverse it. Thank you.”

Only after I stitched the photographed example did I realize that I got the quote slightly incorrect! In my mind and on IMDB.com the line is “…so little to do,” whereas the line in the movie is clearly “…so little to see.” Nevertheless, this project will appeal to fans of the movie and to busy people everywhere (and who of us isn’t busy?).

photo of gene wilder as willy wonkaThe border of this pattern is a homage to the floral fabric in Willy Wonka’s waistcoat. With it’s purple, pink and white flowers on a background of black and light purple, it’s an enduing part of Willy’s ensemble.

 

 

 

 

 

On Spoonflower, there are two separate versions of this fabric, as well as two different “Golden Ticket” fabrics, a reproduction of the “lickable wallpaper” fruit pattern, and a rather unusual fabric of Willy with the Oompa Loompas.

If you’re unfamiliar with the movie, it’s based on the book Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl. At it’s release in 1971 it received good reviews and fared decently at the box office. Since its release for television and home video, it has become a cult classic with quite a few devoted fans.

Dahl didn’t like this version of the movie, saying it strayed too far from his original book. One can understand his concerns, considering the change of emphasis from Charlie to Willy, the introduction of Slugworth as an enemy, and the inclusion of seemingly random literary quotes from various authors. I’ve also heard that the lyrics of the Oompa Loompa’s songs were completely different than what they sang in this this first version.

willy wonka cross stitch pattern so much time and so little to doDahl’s family was much happier with the Tim Burton-directed version of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory starring Johnny Depp from 2005. Although they are much different movies, I happen to like them both. Ah, but when it comes to quotable lines, the 1971 version certainly takes the (chocolate) cake.

 

This Willy Wonka cross stitch pattern is perfect for all fans of the movie Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory and for all of us with hectic schedules.

Persian Needlepoint Kit Ancora Imparo

This Persian needlepoint kit is now available in my Etsy shop!persian needlepoint kit and pattern ancora imparo

“Ancora Imparo” is a quote attributed to Michelangelo, the Italian architect, painter, poet, and sculptor while he was in his 80’s. Roughly translated, it means “I am still learning,” which, in my opinion, is a darn good philosophy, especially from someone as brilliant as Michelangelo.

Ancora Imparo WIP #1I started sketching my first ideas for this pattern back in 2008. I started with the alphabet pattern which is based on the letters in a William Morris tapestry. I really dove into the detailed design of all the other elements in the summer of 2010, and I finally started stitching in August of 2012 [photo to the right is of my first tiny stitch].

 

I had to take several breaks from Ancora Imparo to work on some other, smaller and simpler projects, but finished the stitching on a very happy day in December 2013.Ancora Imparo Framed Detail

Her details are gorgeous – from tiny three stitch flowers up to the big floral elements. Then the green backstitch pulls all the pieces together. I’m just thrilled with how she turned out.

ancora imparo needlepoint hangingShe hangs gracefully over our front door as a reminder to keep learning.

 

 

 

 

 

For those who like the Persian needlepoint design but may not be so keen on the quote, it is also available as a rug design that features a diamond grid in the center with a few floral elements. Both the “Ancora Imparo” design and the rug design are available as patterns onlypersian needlepoint kit and pattern rug design

To anyone interested in this project, I will say that it is challenging and probably better suited to more experienced needlepointers and cross stitchers. In my previous posts on this project (first update, second update, third update, fourth update) you can see more information on how I tackled my “lovely monster at 22-to-the-inch.” She required a lot of persistence, especially with filling in the backgrounds. However, all that persistence paid off, and she’s just amazing.

Now I look forward to seeing who else appreciates a good challenge like this!

Hexagon Crafts Part 3

Welcome to Hexagon Crafts Part 3! This four part series on hexagon crafts should really be titled HEXIE MADNESS! Part 1 of the series covered quilting, leatherwork, scrapbooking, weaving, and jewelry. Part 2 of the series covered crochet, felt, lace and tatting, polymer clay, origami, and popsicle sticks. Today we’re covering hexagon crafts ranging from sewing to perler beads, pottery to stained glass and more!

Hexagon pattern in car park

[Hexagon Pattern in Car Park by Damian Rees via Flickr]

Hexagon Crafts in Sewing

DSCN2352This Hexie Caddy Pincushion from Pennyshands makes the hexie into a three dimensional and useful crafty organizer.

 

 

 

Here’s a tutorial for this cute, scrappy, and useful fabric and felt hexagon needle book by MyThreeSons.

 

 

Just recently, Kate from See Kate Sew did a guest post on Delia Creates with the tutorial for these adorable hexagon coin pouches. These would make great presents!

 

 

hexagon crafts part 3 - hexagon print dressAnd check out the attractive hexie print fabric on this Anne Klein dress available through Amazon.

 

 

 

Hexagon Crafts in Pottery

Waterfall Blue Handmade Stoneware Ceramic Pottery Hexagon Candy Nut Dish - ButterflyMontezumaMudd offers this lovely hexagonal stoneware dish.

 

 

 

 

 

Hexagonal Prisms with lids: Set of 2I also found these intriguing hexagonal ceramic storage jars by TheeBeesKneesPottery.

 

 

 

 

Ceramic Border Tile -- 1" x 6" Hexagon Border -- Made to OrderAnd if your life isn’t full enough by only crafting hexies, you can have these tiles by FarRidgeCeramics in your home as well! I bet they would be lovely in a kitchen or bathroom, or as a border around a mirror.

 

 

Hexagon Crafts in Knitting

There is a TON of hexie knitting goodness out there, however the volume is not quite as overwhelming as with crochet. I’d like to share this beautiful blanket project by Mags at Grannypurl. There’s just something about the texture and the touch of ombré in the colors that makes me think it has to be SO soft and comfy.

 

Jojoland Melody Swirl Shawl Lijuan JingThis hexie swirl shawl project by JulieRoseSews is similar, but more sheer and WOW the colors!

 

 

 

 

 

 

There’s also this bright and colorful knitted hexie cushion pattern from GreedyforColour. Very fun!

 

 

 

Hexagon Crafts in Quilling

hexagon crafts part 3 - quilled hexagon star of davidThis Star of David project is built from 12 individual quilled triangles. Of course, the six center triangles form a hexagon, and I’m sure that the quilling pattern could be crafted into some outstanding hexie pieces! The pattern comes from the book Quilling for Scrapbooks and Cards by Susan Lowman.

 

 

Hexagon Crafts in Woodworking

Honeycombs-9380I found two good tutorials on making hexagonal honeycomb wall shelves. The first comes from Josh and Sarah on the blog ABeautifulMess,

 

 

 

hexagon crafts part 3 - diy honeycomb shelvesand the second comes from – wow! Is it the same Josh and Sarah? This set comes via DesignSponge.

 

 

 

 

Hexagon Picnic TableIf you’re looking for some outdoor seating, Ana White has these instructions for a hexagon picnic table (with added bonus of what appears to be some good input from one of her users who built the table).

 

 

hexagon crafts part 3 - hexagon boxThis is the first of two instructional YouTube videos from Dumond3198 on how to make a decorative wooden hexagonal box (I’m wondering if there are accompanying .pdfs with material list, directions, etc., if you contact him).

 

 

Hexagon Crafts in Plastic and Perler Beads

Melted Bead SuncatchersI really love this suncatcher project from Jean at ArtfulParent. As she says, the melted beads turned into hexagons, and the projects are bright and lovely and sturdy enough to last for years.

 

 

hexagon crafts part 3 - perler beadsPerler beads, of course, lend themselves to be made into hexagons. I found this unique design on MoonatNoon:

 

 

Hexagon Crafts in Stained Glass and Mosaic Tile

Posted ImageThis post at StainedGlassTownSquare is a useful tutorial on how to cut hexie shape glass pieces for use in stained glass projects. I’d love to see some of these in use!

 

 

 

hexagon crafts part 3 - hexagon mosaic tileThere appear to be quite a few hexagonal patterns in stained glass – not necessarily the component pieces, but more in the finished product. FaveCrafts has this tutorial for a Falling Leaves mosaic garden stone.

 

 

 

hexagon crafts part 3 - poppy stained glassPDQPatterns has this pattern for a window full of pretty poppies

 

 

 

hexagon crafts part 3 - stained glassThere are a number of free hexagonal stained glass patterns at ChantalStainedGlass. Here are a few of my favorites:

The Easy Hexagon Pattern,

 

 

 

 

 

hexagon crafts part 3 - clematis stained glass

the Clematis Pattern,

 

 

 

 

 

 

hexagon crafts part 3 - celtic knot stained glass

the Celtic Knot Pattern,

 

 

 

 

 

 

hexagon crafts part 3 - geometric bougainvilleaand the Bougainvillea Pattern.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hexagonal Glass Tables: Isom by Sebastian Scherer in home furnishings  CategoryAlthough it’s not a tutorial, I just had to include these beautiful hexagonal glass tables by Sebastian Scherer featured on Design-Milk.com. They’re gorgeous!

 

 

That wraps up Hexagon Crafts Part 3! Is there anything else in these crafty categories (sewing, pottery, knitting, quilling, woodworking, plastic and stained glass) that you would like to add in the comments?

Make sure you’ve checked out the quilting, leatherwork, scrapbooking, weaving, and jewelry featured in Part 1, the crochet, felt, lace and tatting, polymer clay, origami, and popsicle sticks in Part 2, and stay tuned for the hexie madness still to come in Part 4!

[Update: Here is Part 4 (paint, cross stitch, embroidery, baking, lamp making, and gardening)]

Etsy Shop Updates – June 2013

Just finished up some major Etsy shop updates and maintenance!

First, I converted all my pattern listings to Digital Downloads. I’m very happy that Etsy has created this functionality. My husband and I travel quite a bit, and customers having the ability to download the patterns they purchase will make part of my business life a lot easier.
Slutmuffin Cross Stitch Pattern PDF

[Now I can get your “Slutmuffin” fix to you from anywhere!]

The second thing I did was to my Etsy shop was update my descriptions and tags. Blogging (and to be specific, the WordPress SEO plugin by Yoast) has really made me more aware of the importance of the links between titles, keywords, and descriptions. It’s a bit too early to tell, but initial indications are that these modifications have had a good effect on my views.

This Persian Flower Needlework is based on a very small element from a historical design book.Third, I reduced the prices on quite a few of my patterns just today. The most dramatic drop was on my Persian Flower cross stitch and needlepoint pattern – down almost 50%! But hey, it’s okay, it needed to happen! [I just love this darn flower so much!]

 

 

 

Aside from Etsy stuff, on this blog I’ve got the next three parts of my series on HEXIE MADNESS coming out soon (here’s Part 1), and this Thursday’s ACrafty Interview is with Sasha at WhatNoMints!

Then, of course, I’ve got about a million new ideas in mind. I’ll have a fun new Colorado-themed pattern and kit coming out next week, and I’ve got some ideas about combining stitching and scrapbooking that might work out really well. Stay tuned!

Persian Flower Needlework Pattern

This Persian flower needlework project is another favorite of mine:This Persian Flower Needlework is based on a very small element from a historical design book.

Years ago, I bought three separate but related prints from a vendor at the Metrolina Expo in Charlotte, NC. Two are studies of Persian carpet designs, and the third is a study of Japanese ornamental patterns. I didn’t find out until years later that they originally were in two books: L’Ornement polychrome (1869-1888) and L’Ornement des tissus (1877) by A. Racinet and M. Dupont-Auberville. The books are now published by Taschen in one massive volume as “The World of Ornament.”

I have loved these prints from the moment I saw them. It bugs me that they were part of a book that was destroyed in order to sell the plates individually. If I had known that at the time, I’m not sure I would have purchased them. However, they hang very beautifully on my dining room wall and I admire them constantly.

In one of the three prints on my wall, this one Persian flower measures about 3/4 in at its widest. Something about this tiny flower caught my eye, and I always thought that it would lend itself to a big needlework project. It turned out absolutely stunning!A series of photos that show the progress on my Persian flower needlework project

Above is just a thumbnail of the progress on the pattern done as a needlepoint project. Click on the thumbnail(s) to go see the entirety of the interesting progression on Flickr. The pattern (and sometimes kits) are available on Etsy.