Five Tutorials I Would Like to Try

link-love-icon250Following Diane and Tammy’s Link Love mission, today I’m sharing five tutorials I would like to try!

 

 

 

 

 

Chevron Scarf#1 Jody McKinley’s Chevron Scarf pattern on her JavaJem blog. I also featured this project in my recent post on variegated yarn projects. I just love how the six different colorways of Koigu combine so cheerfully. My biggest hesitation on this one is that I have never knit a single stitch. I’m thinking I’d have to tackle some much simpler scarves before attempting this beauty.

 

 

 

 

#2 This DIY Chevron Wall Art project by Emma of MyBojuLife. There’s lots of paint chip art out there, but this one grabbed my particular attention. I have a lot of leftover paint chips from when we remodeled one of our bathrooms, and this looks to be a quick and fun project.

 

 

#3 Rachel at LinesAcross has this tutorial on how to make beads from scraps of paper and leftover embroidery floss. This tutorial I also featured in a previous post on using flosses in jewelry. It’s a brilliant way to be creative and thrifty at the same time, and I think I have an idea of how to use these beads in projects other than jewelry…

 

 

 

#4 I love the concept behind this baby mobile by Alisa Burke guest posting at SewMamaSew. Once again, I featured this project in a fun previous post about water-themed crafts. With a minimum of planning and expense, she created this striking project. I don’t know any babies who are currently in need of a mobile, but I know some little boys who might like to help me make them a cool door curtain…

 

 

 

 

Picture of Rain Gutter Garden Planter Troughs#5 Last of the five tutorials I would like to try is some variation of this Rain Gutter Garden Planter tutorial on Instructables. Our house is on an incredibly tiny lot, and planters are our only option. Using rain gutters is an economical way to go vertical without creating too much weight. We’re thinking that some (shallow-rooted) herbs and lettuces might be a nice place to start!

My previous posts in the Link Love Mission include “Five Books I Made Something From,” “Five Posts I’m Proud of Creating” (note: from early in the history of this blog), “Five Favorite Projects for DIY Crafty Goodness,” and my favorite and most important: “Five Blogs that Make Me Laugh.”

Water Themed Crafts Part 3

Welcome to healthy water themed crafts part 3! This series is all about crafts that encourage us to drink more water and that help us appreciate clean rivers, lakes, and oceans.

Part 1 covered crochet, woodworking, quilling, lace and tatting, weaving and tapestry, and mosaic tile. Part 2 featured polymer clay, embroidery, scrapbooking, metalworking, ceramics, and stained glass. This is the third of my six posts covering everything from leatherwork to baking, beadwork to soapmaking and everything in between…
Tidal Pool Reflections

[Tidal Pool Reflections by Sherry Buck via Flickr]

Water Themed Crafts in Knitting

Knit_bottle_1_small2Here’s a few patterns for water bottle holders that (hopefully) will encourage us to drink more water, or at least make us look more fabulous carrying around a water bottle. First up is this pattern by Kelly Spenhof on Ravelry.

 

 

 

 

 

 

water bottle cozy carrierNext is this project on About.com Knitting that, as an added bonus, uses yarn that is made in part from recycled plastic bottles.

 

 

 

 

 

healthy water themed crafts part 3 - knit water bottle holder made with hemp yarnFinally is this pattern from LanaKnits that uses a relatively small amount of hemp yarn.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hand Knit Ocean Waves Cowl - Hand Painted Blue Green Cowl -  Merino Wool Cowl - Chunky Yarn Infinity ScarfA little watery inspiration can be found in this chunky merino cowl offered by HandKnitPalette on Etsy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

On Ravelry is this lovely Ocean Serenade shawl by Christine Burkhard

 

 

 

 

and Sandra Singh offers this Gentle Breezes pattern by HeartStrings. Despite the “airy” title, the breaking waves and ocean spray are easy to see in in this shawl.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Frozen Lake Erie from Edgewater ParkThis post by Jeanne at LifeinCleveland describes her watery inspiration and the pattern source for this very attractive hat.

Water Themed Crafts in Paint

Chalkboard Nails: Summer nail art tutorialFirst up is a bit of a lark – I’m not sure if nail art counts as a craft, but here’s a tutorial for these nails by ChalkboardNails that certainly are cute and show an appreciation for clean oceans!

 

 

 

healthy water themed crafts part 3 - undersea mural stencilsFor kids (or fun adults!) there’s this undersea-themed stencil kit which is a great way for children to start learning about the importance of clean water.

 

 

 

 

Although there are other wave paint patterns out there, I found this pattern via Houzz particularly appealing. These waves could be in any number of color schemes and still convey a watery vibe.

 

 

 

From PureJoyEvents comes this tutorial for this really clever and inexpensive ocean-inspired ombre backdrop made of paint sticks.

 

 

 

DIY project jewelry-9653And from Seriously, I’m Thrifty, here’s a great DIY tutorial for painting this jewelry box. Nice to take a solid but dated looking piece and give it a modern and fresh look! If you were wanting a more ocean-y look, you might think about replacing the hardware with some fun glass or shell-shaped pieces.

Water Themed Crafts in Beadwork

healthy water themed crafts part 3 - beading water bottle sayingThis link to CafePress shows all the water bottles available that are “bead” related. So there are some references to Mardi Gras beads and some other things that aren’t crafty, but there are quite a few that definitely would appeal to crafters.  I have to say I’m partial to the saying on the right:

healthy water themed crafts part 3 - russell morton four seasons of water project detailFrom the Eugene Register-Guard and FireMountainGems are two articles about the same stunning project by Russell Morton. His “Four Seasons of Water” was created “as his effort to clean up the earth’s water in his lifetime.” And while he was beading, his “attention was completely focused on holding the thought of clean water.” A stunning and noble project.

More inspiration can be seen in this post by LissC of her fun underwater cuffs. Love her use of circles to represent the swirling water!

 

 

bead embroidery, BJP by Robin Atkins, AprilSome freshwater ideas may come from this waterfall piece by Robin Atkins via her Beadlust blog.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hannah Rosner offers this Hosukai Great Wave beading pattern through her Etsy shop, HannahRachel.

 

 

 

healthy water themed crafts part 3 - printed beading iphone coverIf you don’t want to make your own wave-pattern beaded iPhone case, you can always just purchase this printed one from Zazzle.

 

 

 

Lastly is this beautiful beaded valentine by Susan Elliott at PlaysWithNeedles. I encourage you to read the touching story behind this piece. The colors and textures used evoke sea and shore in a lovely way.

Water Themed Crafts in Leatherwork

healthy water crafts - leather wristletWe’ll start off with this cute wave wristlet bag by Susan Clark Designs via NausetSurfShop.

 

 

 

 

 

healthy water themed crafts part 3 - hokusai leather kindle coverThen there is this sophisticated handmade Hokusai Wave Kindle cover from OberonDesign.

 

 

 

 

healthy water themed crafts part 3 - wave leather beltI wish there was a tutorial for this belt! Love how the braided wave makes this belt (available on Amazon) a little more interesting.

 

 

 

 

Hand Painted Leather Wave Hair BarretteThis barrette by SarahsArtistry on Etsy is an interesting way to combine leather and paint to create a wave look.

 

 

 

Leather Single Fold Wallet with Hidden Pocket Hand Carved Waves Design Made in GA USAI really like this carved waves wallet by Peggy Broome in her Galeatherlady Etsy shop. The shapes and especially the colors make this leather gorgeous and distinctive. The pattern is also used on a fun hair barrette.

WIS Design’s Decades Chest of Drawers, Salone Satellite Milan 2008, WIS Designs furniture, Salone Internazionale del Mobile, Inhabitat Salone 2008, Milan Italy 2008, Milan Furniture Fair, sustainable design Milan, reclaimed materials, WIS Design’s Decades Vanity Easy Chair detail at Salone SatelliteThis chair cover is a great idea – made from pieces of repurposed leather. The post on inhabitat calls them scales, but why not call them waves? Once again, there’s no tutorial on this, but what a great opportunity for a DIY project!

Water Themed Crafts in Chainmaille

There are a lot of chainmaille patterns that, with the right color rings, can be made to look like waves or like water. Here are three examples that are among the best. The first is this undulating pattern as seen on BlueBuddhaBoutique.

 

The second is a tutorial available on WolfstoneJewelry’s Etsy shop for this really attractive Japanese wave pattern.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chainmaille Necklace Japanese Wave  (Multiple Colors Available)The last is this simple but elegant necklace as seen in MorganasDesigns Etsy shop. The beads used in the photo are good, but imagine this with some watery blues and greens!

 

Water Themed Crafts in Gardening

Water is, of course, of supreme importance when it comes to gardening. I’ve found a few good ideas about water gardens, collecting water, and using clean water in hydroponics. Before I delve into that, however, I thought I’d share this fun wave wall rack as seen on LawnandGarden Retailer for hanging plants. It would be a pretty way to divide areas in a garden!

 

Diy Bubble fountainJamie at ScatteredThoughtsofaCraftyMom has this excellent tutorial on how to make a bubble fountain in a pot. Bubble fountains are attractive and make soothing sounds, but to buy one already made from a garden store can be expensive! Jamie’s instructions will save you a lot of time and money.

 

 

 

 

 

02.07.09_WaterGarden_01.jpgFor those of you who would like a water garden but have limited space, ApartmentTherapy has a DIY to create this lovely planter.

 

 

 

healthy water themed crafts part 3 - cover of water gardeners bible bookThere are a ton of books on water gardens. Just type that phrase into a book search on Amazon and you’ll get a lot of good options. The first result on Amazon is the well-reviewed The Water Gardener’s Bible by Ben Helm and Kelly Billing.

 

 

 

 

healthy water themed crafts part 3 - rainwater collection barrelWhen it comes to conserving water, MotherEarthNews has some great instructions on how to make your own rainwater collection barrel. From possible ways to get a free container to how to keep mosquitoes out, this is definitely full of helpful info.

 

 

 

 

 

 

There’s a similar DIY on the Instructables site about a 275 gallon rainwater collection system. As an added bonus, there’s an update from EcoProjecteer in July 2013 that shows some of how they tripled the capacity, raised the containers, and managed to make them look nice!

 

healthy water crafts - hydroponic vegetable gardening setupThen there’s the rapidly growing topic of hydroponics. The information available can be overwhelming, but this article, also at Instructables, may be a good place to get started. It outlines the basics and has ideas for DIY systems while saving money over purchasing prepackaged systems.

 

This DIY by Dean at UrbanGreenSurvival details how he turned water bottles into a series of hydroponic mini green houses. This looks like a great way to use window space and repurpose otherwise wasted plastic bottles into an efficient hydroponic system.

 

That finishes finishes this healthy water themed crafts part 3, covering knitting, paint, beadwork, chainmaille, leatherwork, and gardening. Is there anything in these crafty categories that you would like to add to the comments?

Make sure you have checked out Part 1 and Part 2 of this series! And stay tuned for the next THREE installments, featuring jewelry, glass work, origami, felt, candlemaking, basket weaving, and a whole lot more!

[Update: Here are Part 4Part 5, and Part 6 in the series!]

ACrafty Interview with Mimilove

Welcome to today’s ACrafty Interview with Mimilove – painter and embroiderer Karen Grenfell.

When did you start crafting? KG: I have been painting for many moons, but it was in 2002 that Mimilove was born, providing a range of artworks mainly large portraits and abstracts for both individual and commercial clients. In 2004/5 a selection of my work appeared at the Birmingham Nec as part of the Memorabilia UK show, it was here that several paintings were signed by celebrities including David Carridine and Britt Ekland.
Daisy02

The sporting heroes World Cup winner Sir Geoff Hurst MBE and boxing legend Sir Henry Cooper OBE also signed pieces and the Henry Cooper painting was eventually sold at Sotheby’s later that year!

Since then I have been involved with providing illustrations and artworks for various companies including Blast Recording Studios and Brand New Films.
Funky Chickens!

A collaboration with promoter Steve Wraith and former Sex Pistol Glen Matlock helped to raise funds for children’s charity The Bubble Foundation UK. I have also worked with former Scorpions keyboard player and prog rock musician John Young and grafitti/street artists Id iom.

Over the past 2 years I have moved away from the large scale “pop art” pieces and have combined my love of embroidery with painting to produce mixed media works including a range of Cockney Sparrows and Budgie Stufferies and a unique pet portrait service which can be found around the globe from Alaska to Australia!

What crafts have you tried and what is your current favorite? KG: Ooo all sorts from knitting and crochet (epic failures!) to most recently, concrete casting!
Hero in a half shell...

I pretty much enjoy all the art/craft projects that I do, or try to do! Obviously I’d have to say my painting and embroidery is my main love but I do enjoy pottering around in my garden shed and messing around making things for the garden… I have made quite a few insect and bee houses this year which I’m quite proud to say all have tenants!

What is the silliest question you’ve ever received about your craft? KG: I don’t think I’ve been asked anything silly really. And even I did I would answer it, as I’m always delighted if people are willing to take the time to ask me anything about what I do!
Gordon Bennett! Cockney Sparrow-bit peckish!

What craft project are you most proud of? KG: I would have to say all of the commissioned portraits I’ve worked on. At times they can be overwhelmingly emotional as a lot of the portraits are done posthumously and commissioned by a grieving owner and I’m only too familiar with how devastating a loss like that can be, but when you get it right it’s so rewarding and such a lovely feeling.
Doggy commission - After!

But to know you’ve made someone happy, laugh or cry (in a good way!), that all the research, getting to know the subject, etc. has worked, you can’t get better than that.

What’s the largest craft project you’ve ever tackled? KG: It was actually a painting commission a few years ago. I was commissioned by Blast Recording Studios (in Newcastle-upon-Tyne) to provide a range of musician/band portraits for their new studio. There were 15 in total, most of which measured over 6 ft. x 5 ft. That was quite a challenge, as was posting them!
Gnomely Lonely Heart

Has a craft or craft project ever challenged you in an unexpected way? KG: Apart from threading the needle with my increasingly bad eyesight?! Trying to maintain confidence and motivation especially during quieter times… It’s like buses; nothing for ages and then all of a sudden 3 come along at once! Also juggling the time for family, cake breaks/naps and the boring day-to-day stuff etc.
...Winter wonderland

How has crafting affected your character? Has it made you more patient, grateful, organized, supportive, adventurous, persistent, proactive, independent, diverse, imaginative, observant, expressive, consistent, brave, calm, etc.? KG: All of the above!

Crazy World of Arthur Brown Guinea Pig!Can you share a story about how your crafting has affected others? KG: I recently had a comment from a teacher in the USA who uses pictures of my work to inspire her students and I have also had a lot of students from various fields (art, textiles, etc.) who have included my work/cited it as their inspiration in their projects and essays which I was really chuffed about. I have had some really touching emails and letters from people that I have worked for too, which I keep as they inspire me to keep working.

 

What is the one question you’ve never been asked about your craft that you’ve always wanted to answer? KG: That’s a tough one! I’m not really sure?! I do get a lot of people contacting me asking me about my technique and where I get my inspiration from etc. which is lovely because it’s nice to know I’m doing something folks are interested in!
Pidge

What crafty goodness do you have coming up in the future? Why is it appealing to you? KG: From an art point of view I’m busy with commissions and I’m also going to be holding a three day workshop/talk for the Northern Ireland Embroider’s Guild in November so really looking forward to that, although quite nervous too!
Pigeons

On the home front my husband and I are currently in the middle of completely renovating our garden, so I’m working on lots of different projects. I’ve completed a lot of insect/bee hotels and have most recently woven a hazel fence and archway. Our next project is a living willow sculpture and we’ve also recently acquired a concrete polisher so there will be a lot of casting activity!

Big budgie blog GIVEAWAY!I just love being in the garden and in touch with nature etc., and there’s that wonderful feeling at the end of the day, even when you’re absolutely exhausted and filthy when you sit back and look at what you’ve achieved. I also got a great buzz (pardon the pun!) when my first leaf cutter bee moved into the bee box I built!

 

I’m a huge fan of Karen’s work. Her watercolors are absolutely stunning on their own, but the embroidery gives her pieces such texture and depth – they’re like nothing else on earth. So a special thank you from me to Karen for participating in this ACrafty Interview series!

You can follow Mimilove’s adventures on her websiteFlickrblog, Facebook, and Etsy. She says “I’m always thrilled when folks visit my sites so please do drop by and say hello! :)”

Would you like to be a part of the ACrafty interview series? Just contact me! You might also be interested in reading some more ACrafty Interviews with multi-crafter Diane from CraftyPodembroiderer Sasha of What. No Mints?embroiderer Ellen of Schindermania!, the multi-talented David Tedin, needlepointer Haruhi Okubo of Cresus-Parpi, and tatter and chainmailler Jeff Hamilton.

Book Review: Crochet Saved My Life by Kathryn Vercillo

A few months ago, I had the pleasure of finding the CrochetConcupiscence blog. Kathryn’s work on that blog, rounding up the best of crochet from around the web, is to be lauded. Not only does CrochetConcupiscence cover the best in patterns and projects, but also the best in what crochet can do FOR crafters.

Her book, Crochet Saved My Life, is a thorough summary of the benefits of crochet. Through a combination of interviews, article research, and her own personal experience, Kathryn explains the benefits of crochet for mental conditions including depression, anxiety, OCD and addiction, PTSD, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, Alzheimer’s, and dementia, for physical conditions such as chronic pain, fibromyalgia, multiple sclerosis, Lyme disease, restless leg syndrome, and Menière’s disease, and as a tool in occupational therapy.

The book isn’t “light reading,” but Kathryn keeps the writing interesting and direct. The stories around her own experience as well as the two dozen other people she interviewed are presented matter-of-factly – as a way to demonstrate how crochet has benefited their particular situations. And the benefits are many: calmness, focus, relaxation, creativity, productivity, generosity, and increased self-esteem just to name a few.

a crochet hook heartAlthough the book focuses on crochet, as a needlepointer and cross stitcher, I know that I definitely experience the same benefits as Kathryn’s crocheters. Fortunately, I do not suffer from any of mental or physical conditions mentioned in the book, but I still benefit from my craft. Indeed, I tend to think of my needlework as a bit of preventive medicine! I can easily see how many of the same benefits apply toward other crafts – knitting, scrapbooking, woodworking, gardening, pottery, beading, weaving, jewelry making, quilting, just to name a few.

Polymer Clay Crochet Hook HandlesI would recommend this book to anyone dealing with any of the mental or physical conditions listed above either with yourself or with a loved one. I would also go as far as to say that psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, occupational therapists, counselors, gerontologists, life coaches, and other professionals in mental and physical health would find this book a very valuable resource in their toolkits.

One final, rather curious, comment about this book. In her chapter on depression, one of the topics Kathryn covers is the sense of touch. She mentions that “a fuzzy pet can be a great comfort,” and that “the feel of working with yarn can be one of those healing touch options” as well. Well, I found the book itself to have a similar beneficial effect! To be specific, the feel of the edge of the book and quickly flipping the pages with my thumb had a very calming effect. In fact, I found myself thumbing the pages almost unconsciously while I was reading. Fascinating!

Visit CrochetConcupiscence for the latest in crochet trends and benefits. And visit CrochetSavedMyLife.com for more about the book and Kathryn’s work.

ACrafty Interview with David Tedin

Welcome to today’s ACrafty Interview with David Tedin: carpenter, baker, basket weaver, woodworker, cook, and gardener. He is of Scandinavian heritage but has the soul of a Tuscan chef, and his biscotti is so good that he brings it to Italy (seriously!).

acrafty interview with david tedin basket collectionWhen did you start crafting? DT: To answer that, I would have to decide what is crafting and what is just making stuff. I can remember, before I even started school, nailing two pieces of wood together and nailing a sardine can on the back to make a truck. That would be making stuff. Because you needed something or thought it would be neat.

My family made gifts for Christmas, birthdays, and other gift-giving occasions.  So I guess it started at home at an early age.

seashell jewelry collectionWhat crafts have you tried and what is your current favorite? DT: Stenciling designs on towels and pillowcases, and making shell jewelry. This was something I enjoyed doing. There were kits, with packets of different shapes and colors of seashells along with instructions. You could make earrings, pendants, pins, and brooches. I haven’t seen these kits in over 50 years.

I’ve also tried whittling, carving, hide tanning and leatherwork, model making (many of these were kits, but some went with whittling and carving), drawing, pottery, basket weaving, gardening, cooking, baking, and woodworking.

acrafty interview with david tedin tableWoodworking is probably my current favorite since I now have the time, place, tools and equipment to do what I want. My woodworking now is mostly small furniture, tables, jewelry boxes, cutting boards, toys, and small projects that other people come up with for me to do.

 

 

Have you ever started a project without a pattern or plan? DT: Many times. It is part of the learning process. At times the results are amazing. Other times it comes out; what is that? Or I don’t want to do that again.

What craft project are you most proud of? DT: Here again, what is crafting?  I am a retired carpenter and a craftsman by trade.

With the help of my wife Rita, we designed and built a 7,000 sq. ft. two story, solar heated home. The only things that were contracted were excavation, concrete delivery, renting a crane to set trusses, hooking up the electrical panel, and installing cable TV. Along with some help from friends pouring concrete and setting trusses, we did the rest. It took 8 years. but it was a great way to retire. Even though I had been in construction for over 20 years I learned a lot. One benefit of many years of crafting, it teaches you how to pay attention to detail.

acrafty interview with david tedin basket from fishing suppliesHas a craft project ever challenged you in an unexpected way? DT: Yes. After watching a lady weaving baskets I thought that would be fun to try. After finally finding a book with instructions on basket weaving, finding the material (reed) in Southeast Alaska was not going to be easy. The basket I chose was coil with a rod core and interlocking stitches. I was a long way from the Southwest where this type of basket is made, so I went to the fishing supply store and bought rope for the core and fishing line (the type used for halibut hooks). I use this basket today when I do weaving demonstrations. It is so strong you can stand on it.

How has crafting affected your character? DT: It has made me more…

  • Patient. When you are working with small pieces, messing up one part can ruin the whole project. This has carried over in my work. When you have to concentrate on getting the small pieces right, then paying attention to detail becomes much easier when working with big pieces in construction. I do not like to do the same job over because I didn’t pay attention.
  • acrafty interview with david tedin kneelerGrateful. For those people who have put up with the mess that I am sure to make with a project, and for the ability to do whatever I may choose.
  • Organized. With any project, I like to have the materials ready ahead of time. It is easy to lose interest if you have to go searching for what you need next.
  • Supportive. If someone shows an interest in something you are doing it is nice to be able to teach another how it is done or just talk about what you are doing. It is also enjoyable to work along side someone who is doing the same thing you are, sharing ideas and methods.
  • Adventurous. Sometimes trying something new may make the stomach a little queasy. It is not only can I do this but can I do it right. It is rather exciting to try something new, but you have to want to do it. I often times had that feeling when I would start a new project in my work.
  • Persistent. This is something I am still working on. Some projects have taken a long time to complete. I suppose it depends on my interest level, sometimes I can get distracted with something that looks more interesting.
  • Proactive. This for me goes with being organized. Anticipating what will be needed and how it should be done. It also worked very well for me in my work.
  • Independent.  At times it is fun to work with others, sharing ideas and different ways to do things; at other times it is nice to be able to work alone. I find it easier to concentrate and things tend to go more smoothly. Most of all the rest of the world goes away.
  • acrafty interview with david tedin basket with pink and purpleDiverse.  Many different things interest me. Seeing something and wanting to try it without the fear of not being able to is great. If I mess it up or quickly lose interest I don’t do it again. The best part is finding things you like and continue doing it.
  • Imaginative. After working with other people’s plans, designs, recipes, etc. and learning the basics I find it easier to adapt or do it my way with good results.
  • Observant. Hopefully I have learned to see what others like and dislike; and how others accomplish some of the same things I am doing.
  • Consistent. I do some things over and over the same way because other ways I’ve tried just aren’t as good. Baking biscotti is one example. With woodworking there is always something new to learn; even though you are making the same initial design. Basket making, and pottery take years of doing to make each one the same.
  • Brave. Just do it.
  • Calm. I’ve found that if I lose my cool or try to hurry what I am doing I usually mess it up.

acrafty interview with david tedin basketCan you share a story about how your crafting has affected others? DT: I’ve taught and encouraged others who have shown an interest in what I am doing to go ahead and try it. I also have taught classes and done demonstrations to the public. I hope that when our kids were growing up my crafts made an impression on them.

 

 

 

acrafty interview with david tedin storage bench

What crafty goodness do you have coming up in the future? Why is it appealing to you? DT: Harvesting and selling the garlic we have raised, canning produce for the coming year. Making spice cabinets for the church bazaar; I’ve never made one before and a friend of ours wanted one modified to fit her spice jars. A half round table, because the plan I have looks interesting. A drop leaf table, a challenge to me because I have never done rule hinges. Basket weaving and baking comes with the winter months.

A special thanks to David for taking the time to do this interview. When he sent his responses back to me he said “I found out more about myself than I thought I would. Things I hadn’t thought about in years and things that I take for granted in daily life.” I always learn something from these interviews and it’s even more special when the interviewee gains from the process as well.

Dave happens to be my uncle (his wife Rita is my aunt), and their son, Chris Tedin, was featured in a previous ACrafty Interview. Another of their sons, Mark Tedin, is an artist probably best known for his continued work on Magic: The Gathering and other fantasy projects.

If you would like to contact David with questions about his crafts (or his outstanding biscotti), please contact me and I’ll be happy to relay the message…

Would you like to be a part of the ACrafty interview series? Just contact me! You might also be interested in reading some more ACrafty Interviews with multi-crafter Diane from CraftyPodquilter Betty Busbycross stitcher Katie Kutthroatembroiderer Sasha of What. No Mints?, jeweler Ron Buhler, and embroiderer Ellen of Schindermania!.

Hexagon Crafts Part 4

Welcome to Hexagon Crafts Part 4! This series on hexagon crafts should really be titled HEXIE MADNESS! Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3 of the series covered all kids of crafts: from quilting to quilling, jewelry to crochet, origami to leatherwork and everything in between. Today we’re covering hexagon crafts ranging from needlework to making a pendant lamp and lots more!

Hexagon sewing machine

 [Hexagon Sewing Machine by Crafty Dogma via Flickr – (what a beautiful machine!)] 

Hexagon Crafts in Cross Stitch, Needlepoint, and Embroidery

StitchyPuff - Cross Stitch Chart PDFDragonflylotus Designs offers this cheerful hexipuff pattern.

 

 

 

 

 

hexagon crafts part 4 - hexagon shaped plastic canvas boxThis pattern for a hexagonal sewing box (or anything box, really) made from plastic canvas is interesting. While this is particular example is pretty, the colors and accents used here don’t intrigue me much. I’m sure that with the right colors this could be made into something really gorgeous!

 

 

Hexagon Stitch ArtMollie of WildOlive created this project which combines fabric hexies with colorful and freeform stitching for a fantastic decorative result.

 

 

embroidery samplerOn FeatheredNestStudio, Jennet posted about her very pretty hexagon embroidery sampler. I like the simplicity and her use of colors and fun stitches!

 

 

Embroidery Pattern Aqua Snowflake Christmas Winter PDFOf course, snowflakes ARE hexagons. I just love these colorful and beautiful embroidery snowflake patterns by Carina at PolkaandBloom.

 

 

 

 

Just two weeks ago, Becca at Ladyface Blog posted this tutorial for embroidering hexagons on tea towels. Very cute!

 

 

Hexagon Crafts in Gardening

hexagon crafts part 4 - hexagon raised bed gardenI wish I had the space for this compact hexagonal raised bed garden! This post by Alexdlp at the Instructables site gives layout suggestions and construction details. The keyhole element to facilitate maintenance is both practical and attractive.

 

 

Quilted Kitchen Garden 01This article at PhoenixPermaCulture doesn’t contain construction instructions, but you can see how they used “salvaged and scrap 2×4 and 4×4 lumber pieced together to form 4 1/2′ across hexagons.” And when you’re gardening for sustenance these hexies are surely a great way to go.

 

Hexagon Crafts in Baking and Cake Decorating

hexagon crafts part 4 - hexagon chocolate wedding cake with flowersOf course, there are many, many hexagonal shaped wedding cakes. Here are two beautiful decorated examples: This Chocolate Garden Wedding Cake by MaisieFantaisie,

 

 

 

 

 

and this henna-themed cake by Natalie at ChandelierCakes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then I found this cake, decorated with colorful fondant hexies, by Maggie at VibranceandChaos.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rainbow hexagon cookies inspired by crocheted afghans!My jaw dropped when I saw these amazing cookies, inspired by crocheted afghans, by Zoe at WhippedBakeshop. WANT. I wonder what flavors are available…

 

 

 

 

Next up are these decorated cookies by EmmyJeanCookieMachine, based on the hexie shaped board game “The Settlers of Catan.” Fun!

 

 

 

 

Bee CookiesI found this recipe for honeycomb stained glass cookies at FancyFlours, with their adorable sugar bees. I’d like to see these cookies made with other flavors and colors of sugar candy as well!

 

Hexagon Crafts Pendant Lamp

PVC-Pendant-Black-After-2This tutorial for a DIY pendant lamp by Amanda at OurHumbleAbode is pretty good! It’s not perfect, but for a first attempt and at the inexpensive price it’s hard to beat. I wonder how it’s held up over time…

 

Hexagon Crafts in Paint

SolidWoodBench has this great tutorial for making a cute hexie stenciled door mat,

 

 

 

 

and Morgan at PepperDesignBlog, as part of a Pinterest challenge, made this planter box with fabu painted hexie accents!

 

 

 

This tutorial from Jesse at NineRed not only shows how to paint some awesome hexies, it also has great information about refinishing any piece of furniture, even if it’s ugly 70’s plastic!

 

 

 

Honeycomb Hexagon Wall @ Vintage Revivals-2This photo and DIY from VintageRevivals left me nearly speechless. HOW COOL IS THIS WALL? Actually, the whole room is very cool, but the hexies and the graduating shades of color – stunning! I imagine that the biggest pain was building the hexagonal wood latticework. Do you think an equally cool latticework could be accomplished using washi tape?

That gorgeous wall wraps Hexagon Crafts Part 4. Is there anything else in these crafty categories (paint, cross stitch, embroidery, baking, lamp making, and gardening) that you would like to add in the comments?

Make sure you’ve checked out the quilting, leatherwork, scrapbooking, weaving, and jewelry featured in Part 1, the crochet, felt, lace and tatting, polymer clay, origami, and popsicle sticks in Part 2, and the sewing, pottery, knitting, quilling, woodworking, plastic, and stained glass in Part 3!