Statistics Cross Stitch Pattern

This statistics cross stitch pattern is now available in my Etsy shop!statistics cross stitch pattern - statistically speaking most people are assholes

The quote for this statistics cross stitch pattern comes from an episode of The Nightly Show on Comedy Central. During one of their #Keepit100 segments, host Larry Wilmore asked the panel (and I’m paraphrasing) if your dog and a stranger were drowning, who would you save, the person or your dog? Rory Albanese replied “If it’s an adult, I save my dog every time because statistically speaking, most people are assholes.” Here’s the clip (you can skip ahead to 1:34):

Keep in mind, I don’t subscribe to this theory most of the time… but there are those moments. As soon as I heard this quote, I scribbled it down and knew I would stitch it someday.

For those of you who haven’t seen it, The Nightly Show is hosted by Larry Wilmore, who did frequent segments on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart. The show debuted in January 2015 and can be seen just after The Daily Show. Although the show might have started off a little awkwardly, I think Larry and his staff have really hit their stride in recent months. The show packs a lot of laughs, fresh, diverse viewpoints, and some great [bleeped-out] cursing. That Larry is a self-described “blerd” (black nerd) appeals to me as well.

statistics cross stitch pattern - statistically speaking most people are assholesThis pattern is packed with mathematical and statistical symbols for various constants and functions. The first “t” is tau, which is a symbol used to represent Kendall’s rank correlation coefficient. The first “a” is alpha, which represents the level of significance, also know as the type I error rate. The second “t” is an addition (plus) sign.

The “S” in “speaking” is an integral sign from calculus, the “E” is a capital sigma that represents a sum, and the symbol for “n” represents an intersection. The “y” and the “G” are both related to Goodman and Kruskal’s gamma. The border pattern is comprised of lower case sigmas which represent the all-important statistic of standard deviation.

It was necessary to take a few liberties with subscripts that complete the pattern and add a little visual interest – but the t sub i very easily could represent interior temperature in engineering applications.

This statistics cross stitch project is perfect for statisticians, scientists, mathematicians, engineers, and smart people. It’s also great for curmudgeons and your favorite anti-social grumps!

Water Themed Crafts Part 4

Welcome to healthy water themed crafts part 4! These are crafts that encourage us to drink more water and that help us appreciate clean rivers, lakes, and oceans.

Parts 1, 2, and 3 covered crafts ranging from crochet to polymer clay, woodworking to scrapbooking, and chainmaille to knitting. Today, in this fourth of six posts, I’m covering needlepoint and cross stitch, baking, glassblowing, basketweaving, and sewing.
The Penny Wishing Well

 [The Penny Wishing Well by Paula Steele via Flickr]

Water Themed Crafts in Needlepoint and Cross Stitch

Let me start with this piece by Diane Herrmann entitled “Walking the Water’s Edge” on BridgesMathArt. This combines two of my favorite things, needlepoint and geekery, into a beautiful result. From the post: “To be mathematically precise, we work with the sum of two trigonometric curves to show the action of water as it sloshes over itself in the push to get on the shore.” Love this!

 

healthy water crafts - dragonfly pillowIn a less mathematical vein is this dragonfly cushion kit available on TheStitchery. The 4.5 to the inch gauge would be a bit large for me, but it does have some very pretty watery effects.

 

 

 

healthy water crafts - water dragon cross stitch patternThen I found this Water Dragon pattern available on Flowers2Flowers. Accompanying the Chinese symbol for water, he’s a rather handsome water beast.

 

 

 

 

Needlepoint piece / WMMW BLUE / for cushion cover top or wall decor etc.Finally is this amazing wave interference pattern by Haruhi Okubo of Cresus-Parpi. This is one of the projects from Cresus-Parpi that first got my jaw-dropping attention. If you would like to read more about her works, I featured an interview with Haruhi in July 2013. The original needlepoint project has been sold, but I wonder if Haruhi would consider selling the pattern?

Water Themed Crafts in Baking

I fully realize that the terms “healthy,” “water,” and “baking” don’t necessarily complement each other. However, when it comes to appreciating clean water, there certainly are many examples of this in baked goods. I’ll start with this amazing water cooler bottle cake by YenersCakes in Australia. How fun is this?

 

 

Next up are these clever water bottle cookies by CristinsCookies, made as part of a massive order of seven different bicycling-themed cookies (sunglasses, jersey, bicycle, etc.) for one of her customers.

 

 

This lush scene from BubbleandSweet is really more of a party planning post, but you won’t find a party more water-themed than this. Here’s additional tutorial information about the pearly cake and macaron tower, and the very cute mermaid cookies.

 

 

 

 

cake wavesCraftsy has this great tutorial on how to make wave ruffles from fondant. On the same post, they have a link to this post full of beach-themed cakes. CreativeCelebrations also has this post featuring, among others, numerous examples of cakes with shell and beach themes. Lots of inspiration out there!

 

 

 

 

Waves & Beachy Heart Cookies | Make Me Cake MeI’ll finish up with some helpful tutorials for some gorgeous wavey and beachy decorated cookies. First up are the instructions for these Summer Lovin’ Beachy Heart Cookies by MakeMeCake. Cute!

 

 

 

Beach cookieNext is a link to a video tutorial by Sweetambs for these beach cookies (love the drawing in the sand),

 

 

 

Wave and Surfboard Cookies - by Glorious Treatsand lastly is this totally gnarly DIY for wave cookies (along with some excellent surfboards and swim trunks) by GloriousTreats. Honestly, I’d feel guilty eating any of these cookies I’ve featured as they’re just too gorgeous (but I bet they’re absolutely delicious)!

 

Water Themed Crafts in Glasswork

Let’s start with this simple and pretty tutorial for this beachy glass gem art by Shannon at MadiganMade. It’s inexpensive, sparkly, and in her own words “…this sucker was HEAVY,” but she loves it!

 

 

 

healthy water crafts - lampwork bead with wave patternThere is an ebook tutorial for this gorgeous lampwork ocean scene bead from BeadsandBotanicals via ArtFire.

 

 

 

 

healthy water crafts - lampwork bead with wave pattern tutorialFrom Victoria’sGlassworks on the LampworkEtc site is a DIY on how to create this type of beautiful wavey beads.

 

 

 

Making-Waves-with-Glass-image2BeingBesidetheSeaside shares some information on how to make waves and bubbles in fused glass,

 

 

 

kim merriman fused glass waveand KimMerrimanArt has these examples of colorful waves in fused glass for some inspiration.

 

 

 

Here’s a quick video on YouTube from ExpertVillage on how to create waves in blown glass, and there are numerous sources of inspiration for wave shapes and patterns in blown glass. First is this example by NewHopeStainedGlass on their Etsy store.

 

 

 

 

 

Next is this beautiful “Coastal Bowl” by Wind’sEdgeStudio.

 

 

 

 

Iridescent Hand Blown Glass Bottle VaseThen there is this iridescent wave pattern vase by Josh Fradis in his Etsy store,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

and also this amber wave vase by Carl Radke via ArtfulHome.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Glass wave sculpture by Mario CeroliThis glass wave piece (via CluboftheWaves) by Mario Ceroli is unique and beautiful,

 

 

Chihulybut when it comes to the expression of water and wave forms in blown glass, the ultimate artist may be Dale Chihuly. A Flickr search on “Chihuly” produces some beautiful photos, and his website has all his details, including his exhibition schedule. If you’ve ever been to the Bellagio Hotel in Las Vegas or seen the movie Ocean’s 11, his enormous work “Fiori di Como” adorns the ceiling of the lobby.

Water Themed Crafts in Basketweaving

healthy water crafts - chumash native american water basketI was curious about the existence of watertight baskets and I found this conversation on the topic on Yuku. Not surprisingly, it seems they’re difficult to weave, and require maintenance to keep their water-tightness, if not pitch and/or seeds to effectively plug all of the tiny holes. The book Survival Skills of Native California seems to have more definitive information on the topic

 

 

 

 

 

 

healthy water crafts - large wave basket lampshadesI’m happy to say there are some beautiful examples of waves in basket weaving. First are these large scale pieces made by Lin Lovekin as lampshades for a restaurant.

 

 

Wave basketNext is this amazing wave basket piece featured on SmithsonianMag.com.  It was part of an exhibit featuring the basket weaving art of African slaves who were brought to the American South.

 

healthy water crafts - pakistan wave basketThis simple but elegant wave basket is from Pakistan and available on RedPeacockImports,

 

 

 

 

 

healthy water crafts - wave basketand among other of her wavey designs is this fun piece by Sheila Wray on her site, BeyondtheBasicBasket.

Water Themed Crafts in Sewing

healthy water crafts - sewn water bottle carrierTo encourage us to drink more water, Jennifer Stern at CraftStylish has this detailed tutorial to sew an embroidered water bottle carrier. I like this tutorial as she describes how to size the carrier for a bottle you already own.

 

 

 

 

 

 

healthy water crafts - sewn layered wave skirtThen what girl wouldn’t want this very cool skirt! This great tutorial by Julie Martin of ZozoBugBaby via PetitePurls has measurements for different sizes and ways to reuse fabrics into this pretty project.

 

 

SewMamaSew featured a DIY by Alisa Burke from her book Sew Wild for this water inspired mobile for a baby’s room. I love the unstructured nature of the project, and how it is so bright and colorful while being different from most of the super-cutesy things made for new babies.

 

 

 

 

 

This lovely sea waves pillow is a tutorial from Amy Friend on the SizzixBlog. They share the colors of the gorgeous Kona Cottons they used, and although they used the Sizzix die cutter, I’m sure similar shapes could be achieved other ways (and how did she get her points to match up so perfectly?).

 

Pin cushion tutorialI adore this larger scale “pin pillow” by Lori at TheInboxJaunt. It’s a great way to use up tiny scraps and make a colorful and very functional pincushion. I’d love to make one someday!

 

 

I’ve found two tutorials for wavey bags. The first is the (depressingly named but very pretty) Wave Goodbye tote on WeddingDressBlue. A nice touch is at the bottom of the post – there are photos of completed projects by her readers.

 

 

 

 

 

healthy water crafts - wave tucked preppy handbagThe next tutorial is this bright Wave Tucked Preppy Handbag at Sew4Home. The fabrics used in this project are great and I bet there are some other combinations that would be equally fabulous.

 

 

 

 

OCEAN BUTTONS... 5 beach stone button tagsFor the details, these Ocean Buttons by MadeforFun on their Etsy shop would be a perfect way to finish off a water-themed project. Each button is roughly one inch in diameter – making it perfect for a bag or an ocean inspired sweater.

 

 

hd-mosaic_wave_col_3Finally, I had the good luck to find this fun ribbon, based on a mosaic tile wave pattern, on BelloModo. This could be used to beautiful effect in so many projects!

 

 

 

That completes this fourth post on healthy water crafts, covering needlepoint and cross stitch, baking, glass work, basket weaving, and sewing. Is there anything in these crafty categories that you would like to add to the comments?

Make sure you have checked out the previous posts of this series! Part 1 featured crochet, woodworking, quilling, lace and tatting, weaving and tapestry, and mosaic tilePart 2 featured polymer clay, embroidery, scrapbooking, metalworking, ceramics, and stained glassPart 3 covered healthy water crafts in knitting, paint, beadwork, chainmaille, leatherwork, and gardening.

And stay tuned for the next TWO installments, featuring quilting, felt, jewelry, soapmaking, and a whole lot more!

[Update: Here are Part 5 and Part 6 in the series!]

Top 100 Craft Blogs to Follow in 2013?

Wow! So I went through the whole “Top 100 Craft Blogs to Follow in 2013” list as per CouponAudit.com and I have to say I’m a bit confused. This list seems to be one person’s favorite crafty blogs. The one person would appear to be from the Philippines due to the high number of Philippino blogs included in the list. I’ve got nothing against any of the blogs in the list (good for you, honestly!), but I doubt there was any kind of voting involved, and not much due diligence performed:

  • #47 and #80 don’t exist and #86 is essentially closed
  • #49 and #95 haven’t been updated in over a year
  • #51, #63, and #69 don’t have anything to do with crafts
  • #40 and #41, while being nice blogs, have very little to do with crafts

IMGP8562.JPGAll that being said, I did manage to find some new-to-me good stuff on the list (or via the list). First, I have to say I love the sense of humor of Mikey Figgy at “Diary of a Demented Stained Glass Store Owner.” The name alone gives me a chuckle! Check out this post: Study of Einstein’s Brain Reveals Source of Genius. Did you know that Einstein was “a heck of a solderer?” Funny!

 

 

La Villita textiles in San AntonioI’m also enjoying the musings of Elba at Live Colorful. Her post on Mexican textiles is just gorgeous!

 

 

 

Finished Millennium FalconI can’t believe that I haven’t found Geek Crafts before now! What fun is this? Turn a cast into a Tardis? Yes, please! It goes hand-in-hand with this “We Made a Millennium Falcon for Our 9-Month-Old” post from The Pink Toque. Favorite sentence: “Over breakfast this morning I threw together a bandolier for the Schnauzer out of craft foam.”

HS_070108_Rivoli-SwarovskiThe InternationalCraft.com blog has some really interesting articles about jewelry. Not only do they have some DIY tutorials, but they also have articles about things such as the history of Swarovski crystals, jewelry findings and how are they plated, and gemstone folklore; posts that explain more about the materials commonly used in jewelry. Good info for anyone who is into jewelry, really!

New socksMy final mention from this “Top 100” list is Crafts from the Cwtch “(which rhymes with ‘butch’).” I like Sarah’s writing style and eye for color. She creates some really striking knit and crochet pieces. I really look forward to reading more of her posts, past and future.

 

Did you find some new good stuff among this odd Top 100 list? Did you think the list was a bit strange as well?