ACrafty Interview with Pam Harris

Welcome to today’s ACrafty Interview with Pam Harris – multicrafter extrordinare!

Afternoon Tea and Craft on the PatioWhen did you start crafting? PH: I was about 6 years old and I learned to make little Zozobra’s by tying a Kleenex around a cotton ball and sticking on two little eyes. My Mom and I made them as part of a fund raising project for her club during Fiesta de Santa Fe. Most “craft skills” I learned were “useful” – sewing, embroidery, knitting; however, I do recall making little rolled paper beads with my Great Grandmother. I come from a long line of practical women so anything I made or learned to make (even when very young) had to have lasting value. I have pretty much carried that ethic forward throughout my crafty life.

What crafts have you tried and what is your current favorite? PH: You do know I am an incurable dabbler – right?

Knitted/felted snowman.  Pattern from Marie Mayhew Designs.Knitting, crochet, punched tin, polymer clay, beading, wire and beads, quilting, wheat weaving, shaved wood, wet felting, needle felting, weaving, embroidery, temari, soft toys, gourds, English paper piecing, sewing garments and household goods, spinning, decoupage, bread dough sculpture, macrame, paper, hand building and throwing pottery on a wheel….

Current favorite? Besides any craft having to do with Christmas and Winter Holidays you mean? Mostly working with fiber – any and all of the fiber crafts – what I find myself doing most of the time. I like combining techniques – so that several fiber crafts are included in a project

Celebrating St. Lucy Day - St. Lucy, Star Boy, Scandi-gnome and TomteWhat is the biggest project you’ve ever tackled? PH: It is a toss-up between Austrian shades for Diane’s bedroom when she was a girl, re-upholstering a sofa, and a 4 foot by 6 foot embroidery which took forever! I think I have gotten the need for big projects out of the way!!! Now I relish smaller projects and except for knitting and crochet, and I pretty much prefer to use my own designs.

 

First pair of socks!What project are you most proud of? PH: Learning to knit socks!!

Learning to knit socks was a looooong, fiercely fought battle between the part of me who wanted, like everything, to learn to knit socks and the side of me that is intimidated by anything that is not fairly easy to learn the first time. To give you a clue, just casting on required repeated views of “cast on videos!” Can you imagine what I went through learning short rows or picking up gussets? Many “near-tear moments” I’ll admit! (And a bonus – while knitting the first sock, I became an expert at unraveling my work!!!)

I had no one i could turn to for help so I had to rely on the internet. It is a hugely valuable resource for learning to knit or crochet or sew or….. Coming from a time when such a resource did not exist, I totally appreciate how much the easy access to knowledge adds to the quality of and opportunities to learn in our lives.

So, while the socks I have knitted provide welcome and beautiful footwear, they are much more – a constant reminder of the role persistence and unwillingness to give up plays in the process of learning a new skill.

Using Mod Podge to mount fall leaves to small canvasesWhat is the silliest question you’ve received regarding your work? PH: I can’t actually think of a single silly question. I have been frustrated at times by crafters asking me why their project didn’t turn out only to subsequently find out that they did not follow instructions.

 

Filling up mini muffin cups with tiny hexiesWhat is the most common question you receive regarding your work? PH: How do I manage to do as much as I do!!! The answer is that I tend to be very organized and carefully plan my time so that I can accomplish the things I want to accomplish.

 

Fall Leaves, Mod Podge and Mason Jar = Beautiful CandleWhat is your most popular project? PH: Pretty much a three way split between coloring Easter Eggs with Kool-aid, using Mod Podge and food coloring to tint jars to use as lanterns or vases, and using Mod Podge to apply dried fall leaves to jars. While there are several others that drive large amounts of traffic to my blog, these three are by far responsible for the most traffic.

Dutch Canal Houses embroidery to celebrate St. Nicholas Day/SinterclasDo you sketch or plan most of your work before you begin, or do you generally work without a pattern? PH: I use a pattern when and where it is needed – like a quilt or embroidery, knitted piece or a soft toy – however, as often as possible, I like using my own ideas. Some crafts like painting gourds, punching tin, working with shaved wood or beads and wire and while weaving – I tend not to pre-plan but let my muse have her way with me!!

Saori freestyle weaving, Crochet Tooterphant and Winter Solstice Quilt BlockHas a craft or craft project ever challenged you in an unexpected way? PH: I tend to try new things I know nothing about so I often get into trouble – in lots of unexpected ways!!! But I always find a way to make it happen – learn what I need to learn.

 

 

Punched Tin Butterflies massing on my Seasonal TreeHow has crafting affected your character? PH: For me crafting – making – is as necessary as breathing. It is not something I have acquired – something added. It is who I am. It is a natural expression of my predisposition to create. It is how I function on a daily basis. And so, engaging in craft activity brings me joy, fulfillment, satisfaction.

Taking my craft to a blog has brought me in touch with a unique and inspirational group of new friends from all corners of the earth – women (and men) who are authentic, creative, and each brilliant in her/his own way. I am grateful for these connections beyond words. AND I am thrilled that the blog gives me the opportunity to support and share their talents.

Danish Woven Paper Heart BasketsCan you share a story about how your crafting has affected others? PH: Nothing in particular comes to mind. But my heart is made happy hearing from crafters who leave me comments or who write me e-mails and share how much a tutorial I have written has helped them understand the process behind a particular craft.

 

 

 

 

Guess i am going to learn lace knitting!What crafty goodness do you have coming up in the future? Why is it appealing to you? PH: Weaving bags for Diane (daughter – Craftypod) and myself using all hand spun yarns; designing and creating a primstav (more info) using embroidery; learn simple carving so I can carve my own Christmas elves and Santas; knit a Finnish lace poncho from hand spun yarn; and continue testing cookie recipes for the “Winter Holiday Cookies from Around the World” project!
Sweet Pepperkaker addition to winter holiday baking!

 

Many, many thanks to Pam for taking the time from her busy schedule to participate in this interview series! Pam just celebrated her Five Year Blogging Anniversary (a huge accomplishment), and I know she’s got a lot of winter holiday crafty goodness coming up on her blog over the next six weeks. Just look at those cookies above and how elegantly they’re displayed – can you even imagine how beautiful her whole house must look for the holidays? It’s mindboggling!

You can follow Pam’s adventures on her blog Gingerbread Snowflakes, her Flickr photostream (and Flickr sets with picture guides to all her tutorials), and on Instagram (@gingerbreadsnowflakes).

Would you like to be a part of the ACrafty interview series? Just contact me! You might also be interested in reading some more ACrafty Interviews with (Pam’s daughter) multi-crafter Diane from CraftyPodneedlepointer Haruhi Okubo of Cresus-Parpitatter and chainmailler Jeff Hamiltonpotter Nancy Germondbasketweaver Tina Puckettcross stitcher Meredith Cait, the two part interview with textile artist Arlee Barr, and Halloween costume maker Justin Newton.

ACrafty Interview with Nancy Germond

Welcome to today’s ACrafty Interview with Nancy Germond, potter for Germond Designs.

freedomWhen did you start crafting? NG: I started crafting when I was really little – my favorite baby sitter used to spend hours drawing with me and my mom taught me to sew back in elementary school. I’ve been crafting since I’ve been walking!

 

 

acrafty interview with nancy germond '70s red birdWhat crafts have you tried and what is your current favorite? NG: I have tried everything from painting to macrame to knitting to decoupage to metal stamping. Clay is my current favorite medium because it is SO versatile and it has allowed me to incorporate many different crafts such as silk screening and painting.

 

Nest with Green EggsWhat is the silliest question you’ve ever received about your craft? NG: I once completed a tile backsplash for a client and she asked if the design would wipe off if she used water… practical question from her perspective but what kind of backsplash would that have been?!

 

 

Nancy Jean & Lima BeanWhat craft project are you most proud of? NG: I am super proud of my most recent sculpture – the inspiration was a 7000 mile road trip towing a 1975 trailer. The sculpture is a self portrait of me, with the wind in my hair, popping out of the top of the trailer’s ceiling (see picture). It’s titled “Nancy Jean and Lima Bean.”

 

 

 

What is your most popular (or bestselling) project? NG: My doodle bowls are very popular and I have many customers who keep growing their collection. Each bowl has a unique design and the size is perfect.
Doodle Bowl Grouping #2

 

Gold Aqua BowlHas a craft or craft project ever challenged you in an unexpected way? NG: Getting organized enough to travel with my art booth was quite challenging – thank goodness I have the Lima Bean! On my first out of state show, my car was packed with my pottery and my tent and shelves were packed into the camper. After my 12 hour first leg of the journey, I pulled into a KOA campground, crawled over the supplies and slept on my little twin bed. The golden rule is NO pottery packed into the trailer – it would end up in many, many pieces after the first bump in the road.

BlackBirdLIteBlueDotsHow has crafting affected your character? NG: Devoting 100% of my time to making art was a huge leap of faith but one I had to take! It can be challenging to make art that you hope someone will like enough to purchase but I’ve learned to trust myself and ‘go’ with it. I constantly quell the thoughts of self doubt and replace them with gratitude, thankfulness and joy at being able to do art full-time. I never have to ‘make’ myself do art – it’s something I always enjoy and ‘must do’ to be happy – like breathing and exercise. This summer, I made the decision to apply to art shows in Colorado so I could escape the crazy Texas heat – I call that ‘creating my own universe’ as well as creating my own art!

Bird and RosesCan you share a story about how your crafting has affected others? NG: After an art show at my house, a good friend of mine decided she could also follow her passion – baking. It’s a great story – Amanda and her mom, Kit started the venture called Tiny Pies. Since starting the company in 2010, they have been written up in Oprah Magazine and recently appeared with Katie Couric. While their success is due to a fantastic product and lots of hard work, I like to think that my decision to follow my passion inspired them.

Navajo Wisdom BowlWhat is the one question you’ve never been asked about your craft that you’ve always wanted to answer? NG: Hmmm – that would have to be “Would you be interested in having your product for sale in Anthropologie?!” followed by “Sorry, we won’t be able to pay you in dollars – would you accept bartering your pottery for our fabulous clothes?”

 

Grasshopper Butter dishWhat crafty goodness do you have coming up in the future? Why is it appealing to you? NG: [Some new pieces made their premier at a show in Salida, Colorado on August 10-11.] I love the interaction with people at art shows – it’s always interesting to see which pieces sell and to whom. I was super excited to sell a grasshopper butter dish to a woman whose husband worked for Grasshopper Mower- how perfect is that?! I am a total extrovert so while I love creating my pottery in my studio, I live for customer interactions at art shows! I am also excited to be back in the studio later in the month; I want to make some little wall plaques to sell at my next show in Durango late September.

Thanks so much to Nancy for participating in this ACrafty interview series! I saw her lovely booth at an art show a few weeks ago and was drawn in immediately. Nancy really struck me with her open and positive attitude and I hope you will be able to meet her and see her lovely works in person!

You can follow Nancy’s adventures on her websiteFacebook, and she’s aiming to really fire up her Etsy shop in September.

Would you like to be a part of the ACrafty interview series? Just contact me! You might also be interested in reading some more ACrafty Interviews with multi-crafter Diane from CraftyPodembroiderer Sasha of What. No Mints?embroiderer Ellen of Schindermania!, the multi-talented David Tedinneedlepointer Haruhi Okubo of Cresus-Parpi, and tatter and chainmailler Jeff Hamilton.

Book Review: Crochet Saved My Life by Kathryn Vercillo

A few months ago, I had the pleasure of finding the CrochetConcupiscence blog. Kathryn’s work on that blog, rounding up the best of crochet from around the web, is to be lauded. Not only does CrochetConcupiscence cover the best in patterns and projects, but also the best in what crochet can do FOR crafters.

Her book, Crochet Saved My Life, is a thorough summary of the benefits of crochet. Through a combination of interviews, article research, and her own personal experience, Kathryn explains the benefits of crochet for mental conditions including depression, anxiety, OCD and addiction, PTSD, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, Alzheimer’s, and dementia, for physical conditions such as chronic pain, fibromyalgia, multiple sclerosis, Lyme disease, restless leg syndrome, and Menière’s disease, and as a tool in occupational therapy.

The book isn’t “light reading,” but Kathryn keeps the writing interesting and direct. The stories around her own experience as well as the two dozen other people she interviewed are presented matter-of-factly – as a way to demonstrate how crochet has benefited their particular situations. And the benefits are many: calmness, focus, relaxation, creativity, productivity, generosity, and increased self-esteem just to name a few.

a crochet hook heartAlthough the book focuses on crochet, as a needlepointer and cross stitcher, I know that I definitely experience the same benefits as Kathryn’s crocheters. Fortunately, I do not suffer from any of mental or physical conditions mentioned in the book, but I still benefit from my craft. Indeed, I tend to think of my needlework as a bit of preventive medicine! I can easily see how many of the same benefits apply toward other crafts – knitting, scrapbooking, woodworking, gardening, pottery, beading, weaving, jewelry making, quilting, just to name a few.

Polymer Clay Crochet Hook HandlesI would recommend this book to anyone dealing with any of the mental or physical conditions listed above either with yourself or with a loved one. I would also go as far as to say that psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, occupational therapists, counselors, gerontologists, life coaches, and other professionals in mental and physical health would find this book a very valuable resource in their toolkits.

One final, rather curious, comment about this book. In her chapter on depression, one of the topics Kathryn covers is the sense of touch. She mentions that “a fuzzy pet can be a great comfort,” and that “the feel of working with yarn can be one of those healing touch options” as well. Well, I found the book itself to have a similar beneficial effect! To be specific, the feel of the edge of the book and quickly flipping the pages with my thumb had a very calming effect. In fact, I found myself thumbing the pages almost unconsciously while I was reading. Fascinating!

Visit CrochetConcupiscence for the latest in crochet trends and benefits. And visit CrochetSavedMyLife.com for more about the book and Kathryn’s work.

ACrafty Interview with David Tedin

Welcome to today’s ACrafty Interview with David Tedin: carpenter, baker, basket weaver, woodworker, cook, and gardener. He is of Scandinavian heritage but has the soul of a Tuscan chef, and his biscotti is so good that he brings it to Italy (seriously!).

acrafty interview with david tedin basket collectionWhen did you start crafting? DT: To answer that, I would have to decide what is crafting and what is just making stuff. I can remember, before I even started school, nailing two pieces of wood together and nailing a sardine can on the back to make a truck. That would be making stuff. Because you needed something or thought it would be neat.

My family made gifts for Christmas, birthdays, and other gift-giving occasions.  So I guess it started at home at an early age.

seashell jewelry collectionWhat crafts have you tried and what is your current favorite? DT: Stenciling designs on towels and pillowcases, and making shell jewelry. This was something I enjoyed doing. There were kits, with packets of different shapes and colors of seashells along with instructions. You could make earrings, pendants, pins, and brooches. I haven’t seen these kits in over 50 years.

I’ve also tried whittling, carving, hide tanning and leatherwork, model making (many of these were kits, but some went with whittling and carving), drawing, pottery, basket weaving, gardening, cooking, baking, and woodworking.

acrafty interview with david tedin tableWoodworking is probably my current favorite since I now have the time, place, tools and equipment to do what I want. My woodworking now is mostly small furniture, tables, jewelry boxes, cutting boards, toys, and small projects that other people come up with for me to do.

 

 

Have you ever started a project without a pattern or plan? DT: Many times. It is part of the learning process. At times the results are amazing. Other times it comes out; what is that? Or I don’t want to do that again.

What craft project are you most proud of? DT: Here again, what is crafting?  I am a retired carpenter and a craftsman by trade.

With the help of my wife Rita, we designed and built a 7,000 sq. ft. two story, solar heated home. The only things that were contracted were excavation, concrete delivery, renting a crane to set trusses, hooking up the electrical panel, and installing cable TV. Along with some help from friends pouring concrete and setting trusses, we did the rest. It took 8 years. but it was a great way to retire. Even though I had been in construction for over 20 years I learned a lot. One benefit of many years of crafting, it teaches you how to pay attention to detail.

acrafty interview with david tedin basket from fishing suppliesHas a craft project ever challenged you in an unexpected way? DT: Yes. After watching a lady weaving baskets I thought that would be fun to try. After finally finding a book with instructions on basket weaving, finding the material (reed) in Southeast Alaska was not going to be easy. The basket I chose was coil with a rod core and interlocking stitches. I was a long way from the Southwest where this type of basket is made, so I went to the fishing supply store and bought rope for the core and fishing line (the type used for halibut hooks). I use this basket today when I do weaving demonstrations. It is so strong you can stand on it.

How has crafting affected your character? DT: It has made me more…

  • Patient. When you are working with small pieces, messing up one part can ruin the whole project. This has carried over in my work. When you have to concentrate on getting the small pieces right, then paying attention to detail becomes much easier when working with big pieces in construction. I do not like to do the same job over because I didn’t pay attention.
  • acrafty interview with david tedin kneelerGrateful. For those people who have put up with the mess that I am sure to make with a project, and for the ability to do whatever I may choose.
  • Organized. With any project, I like to have the materials ready ahead of time. It is easy to lose interest if you have to go searching for what you need next.
  • Supportive. If someone shows an interest in something you are doing it is nice to be able to teach another how it is done or just talk about what you are doing. It is also enjoyable to work along side someone who is doing the same thing you are, sharing ideas and methods.
  • Adventurous. Sometimes trying something new may make the stomach a little queasy. It is not only can I do this but can I do it right. It is rather exciting to try something new, but you have to want to do it. I often times had that feeling when I would start a new project in my work.
  • Persistent. This is something I am still working on. Some projects have taken a long time to complete. I suppose it depends on my interest level, sometimes I can get distracted with something that looks more interesting.
  • Proactive. This for me goes with being organized. Anticipating what will be needed and how it should be done. It also worked very well for me in my work.
  • Independent.  At times it is fun to work with others, sharing ideas and different ways to do things; at other times it is nice to be able to work alone. I find it easier to concentrate and things tend to go more smoothly. Most of all the rest of the world goes away.
  • acrafty interview with david tedin basket with pink and purpleDiverse.  Many different things interest me. Seeing something and wanting to try it without the fear of not being able to is great. If I mess it up or quickly lose interest I don’t do it again. The best part is finding things you like and continue doing it.
  • Imaginative. After working with other people’s plans, designs, recipes, etc. and learning the basics I find it easier to adapt or do it my way with good results.
  • Observant. Hopefully I have learned to see what others like and dislike; and how others accomplish some of the same things I am doing.
  • Consistent. I do some things over and over the same way because other ways I’ve tried just aren’t as good. Baking biscotti is one example. With woodworking there is always something new to learn; even though you are making the same initial design. Basket making, and pottery take years of doing to make each one the same.
  • Brave. Just do it.
  • Calm. I’ve found that if I lose my cool or try to hurry what I am doing I usually mess it up.

acrafty interview with david tedin basketCan you share a story about how your crafting has affected others? DT: I’ve taught and encouraged others who have shown an interest in what I am doing to go ahead and try it. I also have taught classes and done demonstrations to the public. I hope that when our kids were growing up my crafts made an impression on them.

 

 

 

acrafty interview with david tedin storage bench

What crafty goodness do you have coming up in the future? Why is it appealing to you? DT: Harvesting and selling the garlic we have raised, canning produce for the coming year. Making spice cabinets for the church bazaar; I’ve never made one before and a friend of ours wanted one modified to fit her spice jars. A half round table, because the plan I have looks interesting. A drop leaf table, a challenge to me because I have never done rule hinges. Basket weaving and baking comes with the winter months.

A special thanks to David for taking the time to do this interview. When he sent his responses back to me he said “I found out more about myself than I thought I would. Things I hadn’t thought about in years and things that I take for granted in daily life.” I always learn something from these interviews and it’s even more special when the interviewee gains from the process as well.

Dave happens to be my uncle (his wife Rita is my aunt), and their son, Chris Tedin, was featured in a previous ACrafty Interview. Another of their sons, Mark Tedin, is an artist probably best known for his continued work on Magic: The Gathering and other fantasy projects.

If you would like to contact David with questions about his crafts (or his outstanding biscotti), please contact me and I’ll be happy to relay the message…

Would you like to be a part of the ACrafty interview series? Just contact me! You might also be interested in reading some more ACrafty Interviews with multi-crafter Diane from CraftyPodquilter Betty Busbycross stitcher Katie Kutthroatembroiderer Sasha of What. No Mints?, jeweler Ron Buhler, and embroiderer Ellen of Schindermania!.

Hexagon Crafts Part 3

Welcome to Hexagon Crafts Part 3! This four part series on hexagon crafts should really be titled HEXIE MADNESS! Part 1 of the series covered quilting, leatherwork, scrapbooking, weaving, and jewelry. Part 2 of the series covered crochet, felt, lace and tatting, polymer clay, origami, and popsicle sticks. Today we’re covering hexagon crafts ranging from sewing to perler beads, pottery to stained glass and more!

Hexagon pattern in car park

[Hexagon Pattern in Car Park by Damian Rees via Flickr]

Hexagon Crafts in Sewing

DSCN2352This Hexie Caddy Pincushion from Pennyshands makes the hexie into a three dimensional and useful crafty organizer.

 

 

 

Here’s a tutorial for this cute, scrappy, and useful fabric and felt hexagon needle book by MyThreeSons.

 

 

Just recently, Kate from See Kate Sew did a guest post on Delia Creates with the tutorial for these adorable hexagon coin pouches. These would make great presents!

 

 

hexagon crafts part 3 - hexagon print dressAnd check out the attractive hexie print fabric on this Anne Klein dress available through Amazon.

 

 

 

Hexagon Crafts in Pottery

Waterfall Blue Handmade Stoneware Ceramic Pottery Hexagon Candy Nut Dish - ButterflyMontezumaMudd offers this lovely hexagonal stoneware dish.

 

 

 

 

 

Hexagonal Prisms with lids: Set of 2I also found these intriguing hexagonal ceramic storage jars by TheeBeesKneesPottery.

 

 

 

 

Ceramic Border Tile -- 1" x 6" Hexagon Border -- Made to OrderAnd if your life isn’t full enough by only crafting hexies, you can have these tiles by FarRidgeCeramics in your home as well! I bet they would be lovely in a kitchen or bathroom, or as a border around a mirror.

 

 

Hexagon Crafts in Knitting

There is a TON of hexie knitting goodness out there, however the volume is not quite as overwhelming as with crochet. I’d like to share this beautiful blanket project by Mags at Grannypurl. There’s just something about the texture and the touch of ombré in the colors that makes me think it has to be SO soft and comfy.

 

Jojoland Melody Swirl Shawl Lijuan JingThis hexie swirl shawl project by JulieRoseSews is similar, but more sheer and WOW the colors!

 

 

 

 

 

 

There’s also this bright and colorful knitted hexie cushion pattern from GreedyforColour. Very fun!

 

 

 

Hexagon Crafts in Quilling

hexagon crafts part 3 - quilled hexagon star of davidThis Star of David project is built from 12 individual quilled triangles. Of course, the six center triangles form a hexagon, and I’m sure that the quilling pattern could be crafted into some outstanding hexie pieces! The pattern comes from the book Quilling for Scrapbooks and Cards by Susan Lowman.

 

 

Hexagon Crafts in Woodworking

Honeycombs-9380I found two good tutorials on making hexagonal honeycomb wall shelves. The first comes from Josh and Sarah on the blog ABeautifulMess,

 

 

 

hexagon crafts part 3 - diy honeycomb shelvesand the second comes from – wow! Is it the same Josh and Sarah? This set comes via DesignSponge.

 

 

 

 

Hexagon Picnic TableIf you’re looking for some outdoor seating, Ana White has these instructions for a hexagon picnic table (with added bonus of what appears to be some good input from one of her users who built the table).

 

 

hexagon crafts part 3 - hexagon boxThis is the first of two instructional YouTube videos from Dumond3198 on how to make a decorative wooden hexagonal box (I’m wondering if there are accompanying .pdfs with material list, directions, etc., if you contact him).

 

 

Hexagon Crafts in Plastic and Perler Beads

Melted Bead SuncatchersI really love this suncatcher project from Jean at ArtfulParent. As she says, the melted beads turned into hexagons, and the projects are bright and lovely and sturdy enough to last for years.

 

 

hexagon crafts part 3 - perler beadsPerler beads, of course, lend themselves to be made into hexagons. I found this unique design on MoonatNoon:

 

 

Hexagon Crafts in Stained Glass and Mosaic Tile

Posted ImageThis post at StainedGlassTownSquare is a useful tutorial on how to cut hexie shape glass pieces for use in stained glass projects. I’d love to see some of these in use!

 

 

 

hexagon crafts part 3 - hexagon mosaic tileThere appear to be quite a few hexagonal patterns in stained glass – not necessarily the component pieces, but more in the finished product. FaveCrafts has this tutorial for a Falling Leaves mosaic garden stone.

 

 

 

hexagon crafts part 3 - poppy stained glassPDQPatterns has this pattern for a window full of pretty poppies

 

 

 

hexagon crafts part 3 - stained glassThere are a number of free hexagonal stained glass patterns at ChantalStainedGlass. Here are a few of my favorites:

The Easy Hexagon Pattern,

 

 

 

 

 

hexagon crafts part 3 - clematis stained glass

the Clematis Pattern,

 

 

 

 

 

 

hexagon crafts part 3 - celtic knot stained glass

the Celtic Knot Pattern,

 

 

 

 

 

 

hexagon crafts part 3 - geometric bougainvilleaand the Bougainvillea Pattern.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hexagonal Glass Tables: Isom by Sebastian Scherer in home furnishings  CategoryAlthough it’s not a tutorial, I just had to include these beautiful hexagonal glass tables by Sebastian Scherer featured on Design-Milk.com. They’re gorgeous!

 

 

That wraps up Hexagon Crafts Part 3! Is there anything else in these crafty categories (sewing, pottery, knitting, quilling, woodworking, plastic and stained glass) that you would like to add in the comments?

Make sure you’ve checked out the quilting, leatherwork, scrapbooking, weaving, and jewelry featured in Part 1, the crochet, felt, lace and tatting, polymer clay, origami, and popsicle sticks in Part 2, and stay tuned for the hexie madness still to come in Part 4!

[Update: Here is Part 4 (paint, cross stitch, embroidery, baking, lamp making, and gardening)]

ACrafty Interview with Chris Tedin

Welcome to this week’s ACrafty Interview with Chris Tedin. Chris is a potter, and he is also a talented artist in the areas of drawing, painting, and sculpture. He’s a Faculty member of the Animation & Visual Effects Department of the Tribeca Flashpoint Media Arts Academy in Chicago. He can create works in three dimensions in the physical world, four dimensions in cyberspace, and he lives and works around some of the best art and architecture in the world. I have to admit I’m a little envious of his abilities and location (but only in the best ways!).

ACrafty Interview - Chris Tedin pottery teapot 3When did you start crafting? CT: I began to pursue the craft of clay during my senior year as an undergraduate. I was fascinated by the process of building pottery, and the endless possibilities that it afforded me as an artist. I was fascinated by the firing process, and building my own kilns to fire the clay with wood was an incredible experience.

 

 

 

 

ACrafty Interview - Chris Tedin pottery tall vase 1What crafts have you tried and what is your current favorite? CT: I think that clay provides me with the most flexibility in terms of form, and allows me the ability to make functional as well as large scale sculptural works.

 

 

 

 

 

ACrafty Interview - Chris Tedin pottery cup 1What craft project are you most proud of? CT: I think the pieces that are used every day seem to satisfy me the most. The large scale sculptural pieces are satisfying in a totally different way. They are primarily symbolic and aesthetic. Although they are carefully “crafted” in the same way a good coffee cup might be, or a teapot, the large pieces speak to another kind of expression, and therefore are more abstract. A bowl is used every day, and is simple and direct, and easily accepted. Neither is “better” than the other, just serve different purposes. I like to see my work used in an everyday context. When someone enjoys a cup of coffee, I am with them every morning, enjoying it with them. I find a great deal of satisfaction in that.

ACrafty Interview - Chris Tedin pottery teapot 1What’s the biggest craft project you’ve ever tackled? CT: I tend to use my craft projects to “keep it simple” and try not to be too ambitious. My work is direct and quick, for the most part. My sculptures tend to be more time consuming, so I use the crafts I learn in pottery to execute them. I have made works that are over 9 feet tall, and weigh over 500 pounds. But my pottery is much lighter and more manageable. My teapots can be time consuming to execute, requiring me to throw a half a dozen parts, and assembling them together before firing them.

 

ACrafty Interview - Chris Tedin pottery medium vaseHas a craft or craft project ever challenged you in an unexpected way? CT: Each piece has a unique challenge, but as I find myself becoming more familiar with the fundamental forms, they are a natural part of me. The only surprises now are in the glaze firings, when I’m testing out new glazes or firing using different “atmospheres.”

 

 

 

ACrafty Interview - Chris Tedin pottery bowl on wheelHow has crafting affected your character? CT: Working in craft, especially pottery, gives me a strong sense of “center.” I know that, no matter how challenging my day has been, that the clay is always ready for me, and since I know its language, I am always ready for it. I am more patient by using clay, and much more willing to take risks with forms, glazes and allowing for accidents to occur in the work. My imagination is always sparked by things in nature, and I love exploring those forms in my work on the wheel.

ACrafty Interview - Chris Tedin pottery tall vase in progressCan you share a story about how your crafting has affected others? CT: My friend, Joe Crossetto, is a sculptor and painter. After working in clay around him, he got the “bug,” and began using clay as his primary medium for the last 5 years. He purchased a large gas kiln, has executed a dozen sculptures, and throws on the wheel regularly. He loves to experiment with glazes, and it is something that has brought us closer together as friends.

 

 

ACrafty Interview - Chris Tedin pottery bowlWhat crafty goodness do you have coming up in the future? Why is it appealing to you? CT: I have been sketching some ideas for sculpture and pottery, but I will be throwing a lot of large and medium sized bowls in the next few months. It seems that bowls are popular, and I would love to see more of my pieces being used by my friends. I also love throwing bowls because it’s simple, but there are a surprising number of variations that are possible.

Thanks so much, Chris, for sharing your valuable time with us! 

Would you like to be a part of this ACrafty interview series? Just contact me! You might also be interested in reading some more ACrafty Interviews with multi-crafter Diane from CraftyPodknitter Apockylypsequilter Betty Busby, and cross stitcher Katie Kutthroat!