Water Themed Crafts Part 6

Welcome to healthy water themed crafts part 6, the finale of this series! This series of posts are all about crafts that encourage us to drink more water and that help us appreciate clean rivers, lakes, and oceans.

Parts 123, 4, and 5 covered crafts ranging from crochet to polymer clay, woodworking to scrapbooking, chainmaille to knitting and much more. Today, in this sixth post, I’m covering water themes in jewelry, candlemaking, wool dyeing, origami, flower arranging, and more!
Water

[Water by mbasie via Flickr]

Water Themed Crafts in Jewelry

First up is this ingenious way to keep track of your water intake. Contributor shazbraz at pinchingyourpennies.com created these bracelets. Every time she drinks a serving of water, she moves one bracelet from her left arm to her right. It’s simple, pretty, and an effective reminder!

The Nines Beading Pattern - Beaded Multistrand Bracelet Tutorial #1500Simple Bead Patterns has a tutorial for this wavy bracelet available in their Etsy shop,

 

 

 

 

Beach waves and sand knotted in cord and beads macrameI featured this project in Part 5 of this series, in the section on macramé, but as it is just so pretty and it really is a piece of jewelry, I feel like sharing it again here. Sherry at KnotJustMacrame shares this project which beautifully expresses an ocean beach. From her post: “When I added beads, I kept them random, again mimicking the colors of deeper water with highlights up through the foamy green and into the sand.” Sherry offers some tips and tricks on her blog, and has tutorials for sale on her Etsy shop if you like her micro-macrame.

I like this easy tutorial from Jordan at Picklee on how to make this casual and attractive hemp and sea glass bracelet. You could put this together in matter of minutes!

 

 

 

 

knock off braceletAnother quick and easy nautical-themed bracelet tutorial comes from HenryHappened. For less than $6 and 5 minutes time, she created this bracelet that also converts into a necklace!

 

 

Beading Tutorial - Beaded Barely Wavy BraceletOn Etsy, the Splendere shop offers lots of tutorials, one being this simple but elegant “Barely Wavy” bracelet,

 

 

 

 

 

and the LittleRock Etsy shop offers a tutorial on how to silversmith these fun and funky Wave Bangles.

 

 

 

 

 

 

healthy water themed crafts part 6 - water bracelet inspirationSome creative inspiration can be found in this chunky aquamarine, turquoise, and silver bracelet entitled “Dream Big as the Ocean Blue” by Eni Oken,

 

 

 

and also inspiring is this unique and brilliant Beach Bracelet by TerahsClassicCreations. In the link, take a look at the bracelet when it’s unclasped and laying flat. Wow!

 

 

 

 

The WireWorkers Guild website has an interview with Louise Goodchild, who created this delicate and serene wire and beadwork pendant. She has other water-inspired pieces visible in the article as well.

 

 

 

 

 

Through the AlaskaJewelry website, artist Matt Bezak offers this unique and striking wave pendant with diamond accent.

 

 

 

 

The simple ocean-inspired bracelets and necklaces made from charms and beads are a great way to support the Crystal Cove State Park in California.

 

 

 

 

Ocean Mist BangleThe spiral peyote stitch has a natural wave-like form, and it can be used to make both bracelets and necklaces. This tutorial by Inspirational Beading is a great place to learn how to make this pattern.

 

 

 

On the PapernStitch blog, Jenny Hoople shares her tutorial on how to create this gorgeous Falling Water necklace. It beautifully combines pearls, semi-precious stones, and shell coins.

 

 

 

 

When Pearl at BeadingGem reviewed the book Irina’s Inspirations for Jewelry: From the Exotic to the Everyday, one of the projects she featured was this striking Shades of the Ocean necklace. It’s easy to see the progression of beach sand to deep water in this piece.

 

 

 

Instead of using real and often endangered coral, here’s a tutorial from Divya at JewelsofSayuri for a necklace and earrings using (non-endangered) epoxy clay,

 

 

 

 

 

 

and Albina at AroundBeads offers a tutorial to make these pretty and delicate beaded coral tassels that can be made into earrings or pendants.

 

 

 

 

Natalie from NorthShore Days has a guest post on HappyHourProjects on how to make these quick and lovely wire wrapped sea glass earrings. She says that once you get a little experience, you can make lots of these earrings in very little time!

 

 

Copper Wave Wire Wrapped Ring TutorialThrough their Etsy shop, CrossedWiresJewelry offers a tutorial on creating this intriguing copper wave wire ring.

 

 

 

Skylight Jewelers of Boston have several wave-shaped bands in their repertoire, including this gorgeous two color ring.

 

 

 

healthy water themed crafts part 6 - wave curl ringHetWestern offers this sterling silver ring that features a curl in the right break of the wave,

 

 

 

 

 

Titanium Wedding Ring by Exotica Jewelryand ExoticaJewelry has this striking Eastbourne ring with finely detailed waves and spray.

Water Themed Crafts in Candlemaking

ShamrockCandles has this DIY on how to make an oceanic candle with a sea shell plate. In addition, they have a host of other candle ideas and products with ocean themes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

This candle was made with two layers, an inner core pillar candle about 1" smaller in diameter than an outer layer filled with shells and made with a higher melting temperature wax.EHow has this tutorial on creating these pretty shell-embedded candles that involves two layers of wax, the outer layer having a higher melting temperature.

Water Themed Crafts in Wool Dyeing

crock pot dyeingFirst up, I’ve found some interesting tutorials on using Kool-Aid to dye wool. The first method is from Leethal and uses a crock pot,

 

 

 

and the second method by Kerry at TalesofaNeedleandThread uses ice cubes and a sunny day. Both methods look like they could be a lot of fun, and they both produce gorgeous results!

Now, is it possible for those methods to produce anything as pretty as the following examples?

This variegated blue and green by RedRidingHoodYarns is just beautiful.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Handspun Art Yarn - Blue Ocean 3.2 oz 174 yards Bulky WoolThis kinky and fun blue yarn by LenaBrownDesigns on Etsy already resembles ocean waves,

 

 

 

Handspun super bulky bubblewrap yarn - Beach Glassand this is the very aptly named “Beach Glass” yarn from GypseeArtSupplies also on Etsy. It’s so pretty!

 

 

 

Water Themed Crafts in Origami

healthy water themed crafts part 6 - wave origamiGilad Origami has a review of Peter Engel’s book Origami Odyssey. One of the patterns in the book appears to be this wave, folded by Gilad himself.

 

 

 

神奈川沖浪裏 - The Great Wave off KanagawaThe always brilliant blog AllThingsPaper featured this work by Andrea Russo, an Italian artist, titled “The Great Wave off Kanagawa.”

Water Themed Crafts in Flower Arranging

The Dutchbaby website has a photo of this flower arrangement created to compliment a waterfall painting. The arrangement nicely captures the colors and shapes in the painting.

 

 

 

WeddingWire has this post of ocean-themed table centerpieces, most of which are simple and inexpensive while looking elegant.

Water Themed Crafts in Giftwrapping

Color Me Pretty:  Ocean BluesThe last photo in this post from Decor8 on ocean hues is this experiment in gift wrapping. It’s unique and so lovely!

Water Themed Crafts in Digital

Glass Bottle.pngMy last item for this post is from the world of Minecraft, and it’s how to make glass bottles which can then be used for holding water and then on for brewing potions. I wonder if beer is considered a potion?

 

 

 

That hopeful note finishes this healthy water themed crafts part 6, covering jewelry, candlemaking, wool dyeing, origami, flower arranging, giftwrapping, and a little diversion to Minecraft. Is there anything in these crafty categories that you would like to add to the comments?

Make sure you have checked out the previous posts of this series!

ACrafty Interview with Pam Harris

Welcome to today’s ACrafty Interview with Pam Harris – multicrafter extrordinare!

Afternoon Tea and Craft on the PatioWhen did you start crafting? PH: I was about 6 years old and I learned to make little Zozobra’s by tying a Kleenex around a cotton ball and sticking on two little eyes. My Mom and I made them as part of a fund raising project for her club during Fiesta de Santa Fe. Most “craft skills” I learned were “useful” – sewing, embroidery, knitting; however, I do recall making little rolled paper beads with my Great Grandmother. I come from a long line of practical women so anything I made or learned to make (even when very young) had to have lasting value. I have pretty much carried that ethic forward throughout my crafty life.

What crafts have you tried and what is your current favorite? PH: You do know I am an incurable dabbler – right?

Knitted/felted snowman.  Pattern from Marie Mayhew Designs.Knitting, crochet, punched tin, polymer clay, beading, wire and beads, quilting, wheat weaving, shaved wood, wet felting, needle felting, weaving, embroidery, temari, soft toys, gourds, English paper piecing, sewing garments and household goods, spinning, decoupage, bread dough sculpture, macrame, paper, hand building and throwing pottery on a wheel….

Current favorite? Besides any craft having to do with Christmas and Winter Holidays you mean? Mostly working with fiber – any and all of the fiber crafts – what I find myself doing most of the time. I like combining techniques – so that several fiber crafts are included in a project

Celebrating St. Lucy Day - St. Lucy, Star Boy, Scandi-gnome and TomteWhat is the biggest project you’ve ever tackled? PH: It is a toss-up between Austrian shades for Diane’s bedroom when she was a girl, re-upholstering a sofa, and a 4 foot by 6 foot embroidery which took forever! I think I have gotten the need for big projects out of the way!!! Now I relish smaller projects and except for knitting and crochet, and I pretty much prefer to use my own designs.

 

First pair of socks!What project are you most proud of? PH: Learning to knit socks!!

Learning to knit socks was a looooong, fiercely fought battle between the part of me who wanted, like everything, to learn to knit socks and the side of me that is intimidated by anything that is not fairly easy to learn the first time. To give you a clue, just casting on required repeated views of “cast on videos!” Can you imagine what I went through learning short rows or picking up gussets? Many “near-tear moments” I’ll admit! (And a bonus – while knitting the first sock, I became an expert at unraveling my work!!!)

I had no one i could turn to for help so I had to rely on the internet. It is a hugely valuable resource for learning to knit or crochet or sew or….. Coming from a time when such a resource did not exist, I totally appreciate how much the easy access to knowledge adds to the quality of and opportunities to learn in our lives.

So, while the socks I have knitted provide welcome and beautiful footwear, they are much more – a constant reminder of the role persistence and unwillingness to give up plays in the process of learning a new skill.

Using Mod Podge to mount fall leaves to small canvasesWhat is the silliest question you’ve received regarding your work? PH: I can’t actually think of a single silly question. I have been frustrated at times by crafters asking me why their project didn’t turn out only to subsequently find out that they did not follow instructions.

 

Filling up mini muffin cups with tiny hexiesWhat is the most common question you receive regarding your work? PH: How do I manage to do as much as I do!!! The answer is that I tend to be very organized and carefully plan my time so that I can accomplish the things I want to accomplish.

 

Fall Leaves, Mod Podge and Mason Jar = Beautiful CandleWhat is your most popular project? PH: Pretty much a three way split between coloring Easter Eggs with Kool-aid, using Mod Podge and food coloring to tint jars to use as lanterns or vases, and using Mod Podge to apply dried fall leaves to jars. While there are several others that drive large amounts of traffic to my blog, these three are by far responsible for the most traffic.

Dutch Canal Houses embroidery to celebrate St. Nicholas Day/SinterclasDo you sketch or plan most of your work before you begin, or do you generally work without a pattern? PH: I use a pattern when and where it is needed – like a quilt or embroidery, knitted piece or a soft toy – however, as often as possible, I like using my own ideas. Some crafts like painting gourds, punching tin, working with shaved wood or beads and wire and while weaving – I tend not to pre-plan but let my muse have her way with me!!

Saori freestyle weaving, Crochet Tooterphant and Winter Solstice Quilt BlockHas a craft or craft project ever challenged you in an unexpected way? PH: I tend to try new things I know nothing about so I often get into trouble – in lots of unexpected ways!!! But I always find a way to make it happen – learn what I need to learn.

 

 

Punched Tin Butterflies massing on my Seasonal TreeHow has crafting affected your character? PH: For me crafting – making – is as necessary as breathing. It is not something I have acquired – something added. It is who I am. It is a natural expression of my predisposition to create. It is how I function on a daily basis. And so, engaging in craft activity brings me joy, fulfillment, satisfaction.

Taking my craft to a blog has brought me in touch with a unique and inspirational group of new friends from all corners of the earth – women (and men) who are authentic, creative, and each brilliant in her/his own way. I am grateful for these connections beyond words. AND I am thrilled that the blog gives me the opportunity to support and share their talents.

Danish Woven Paper Heart BasketsCan you share a story about how your crafting has affected others? PH: Nothing in particular comes to mind. But my heart is made happy hearing from crafters who leave me comments or who write me e-mails and share how much a tutorial I have written has helped them understand the process behind a particular craft.

 

 

 

 

Guess i am going to learn lace knitting!What crafty goodness do you have coming up in the future? Why is it appealing to you? PH: Weaving bags for Diane (daughter – Craftypod) and myself using all hand spun yarns; designing and creating a primstav (more info) using embroidery; learn simple carving so I can carve my own Christmas elves and Santas; knit a Finnish lace poncho from hand spun yarn; and continue testing cookie recipes for the “Winter Holiday Cookies from Around the World” project!
Sweet Pepperkaker addition to winter holiday baking!

 

Many, many thanks to Pam for taking the time from her busy schedule to participate in this interview series! Pam just celebrated her Five Year Blogging Anniversary (a huge accomplishment), and I know she’s got a lot of winter holiday crafty goodness coming up on her blog over the next six weeks. Just look at those cookies above and how elegantly they’re displayed – can you even imagine how beautiful her whole house must look for the holidays? It’s mindboggling!

You can follow Pam’s adventures on her blog Gingerbread Snowflakes, her Flickr photostream (and Flickr sets with picture guides to all her tutorials), and on Instagram (@gingerbreadsnowflakes).

Would you like to be a part of the ACrafty interview series? Just contact me! You might also be interested in reading some more ACrafty Interviews with (Pam’s daughter) multi-crafter Diane from CraftyPodneedlepointer Haruhi Okubo of Cresus-Parpitatter and chainmailler Jeff Hamiltonpotter Nancy Germondbasketweaver Tina Puckettcross stitcher Meredith Cait, the two part interview with textile artist Arlee Barr, and Halloween costume maker Justin Newton.