Variegated Floss Projects Part 6

Welcome to Variegated Floss Projects Part 6!

Part 1 of the series covered variegated floss projects in the needlework areas of cross stitch, needlepoint, and embroidery. Part 2 had variegated floss in plastic canvas, quilting, felt, sewing, and pom-pom projects. Part 3 explored variegated floss projects in jewelry and scrapbooking. Part 4 looked at variegated projects in knitting, spinning and dyeing. Part 5 featured crochet, lace and tatting, and basketweaving, and this Part 6 will showcase all kinds of crafts in furniture, seasonal projects, string art, and home decor!

variegated floss projects part 6 - DMC 4126

As I said in in Part 1, variegated flosses and yarns are beautiful and they make every piece that uses them unique. No two people will ever use the exact same length of a floss in the same way, thus every project will have a different result! This makes creating with them an exercise in curiosity and a fun adventure.

Variegated Floss Projects in Furniture

So by now we’ve all probably seen a tutorial or six on how to make small yarn or string balls with balloons. This light string DIY by Kimberly at KandyKreations is a good place to start…

 

 

 

and now take that to a much bigger scale and use variegated thread, and you get this beauty! This example, seen on CargoCollective, is from a student art sale,

 

 

 

dsc_8303and CraftyNest has a tutorial to make your own. This example uses 20 lb. weight hemp string as a way to recreate a similar (and expensive) product from a retail shop. I imagine similar methods were used to create the student version above.

 

 

Bonbon by Ana KrasA completely different look for string wrapped pendant lamps is achieved in these unique pieces featured on ManMadeDIY.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There are some great ideas for table lampshades as well! First, there’s this yarn lampshade tutorial at LanaRed. Imagine this in a colorway of cool greys and blues…

 

 

 

 

home077Then there’s this lampshade idea from NorthernCottage. They’ve spaced their string rather loosely around the drum, but you can see how easily the spacing could be tightened up to create a more opaque shade.

 

 

 

 

 

variegated floss projects part 6 - string wrapped lampshadeIf, rather than recreating an entire lampshade, you would just like to embellish an existing shade, there is this fun tutorial from LandofNod (might I suggest DMC 4069?).

 

 

 

 

 

 

It turns out that artists have been wrapping thread on furniture for a while. An interesting example of that are these Spool Chairs by Keisuke Fujiwara as seen on DeZeen. These chairs feature 12 different colors of thread to achieve this variegated result.

 

 

 

Maskcara Office Makeover vintagerevivals.com-11To recreate this look there is this clever tutorial from Mandi at VintageRevivals on how to embellish furniture with embroidery thread.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

anton alvarez: the craft of thread wrappingTake this to the extreme, and you have the art of Anton Alvarez. His invention, the Thread-Wrapping Machine, makes it possible for him to actually join the furniture using glue-soaked threads. It’s fascinating, and you can see more information on the machine and his process at Artsy.

 

 

Variegated Floss Projects in Seasonal Crafts

Embroidery Floss Eggs in BowlSimilar to the light string made with yarn at the top of this post, this DIY by Janel at LifeasMom uses balloons. However, Janel uses variegated embroidery floss rather than yarn to create these slightly more refined Easter egg shapes.

 

 

variegated floss projects part 6 - martha stewart thread wrapped easter eggsThen leave it to Martha Stewart to create the DIY for these stunning Easter eggs using Styrofoam egg forms and perle cotton thread along with some millinery flowers, ribbons, and decorative trim.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Another fun Spring craft would be to make these thrifty “tiny fairy dolls” with this DIY from Angie at TreasuresforTots. I like how she used variegated floss for the hair and some of the other features on the dolls.

 

 

Nikki at EverythingUndertheMoon has this super simple DIY for creating these Autumn pumpkins with variegated yarn. These are fun and a little more crafty than displaying plain foam pumpkins!

 

 

The tutorial for these cute and decorative variegated yarn Christmas trees comes from PrettyDitty (I like how she gives a musical suggestion for making these),

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

and Pam at GingerbreadSnoflakes has the instructions to make these fun star ornaments. I can see some how variegated yarns could incorporate into these nicely!

 

 

 

how to make an easy winter yarn wreath with snowflakes and snowballs The last winter holiday project I’ll feature here is this pretty Snowflake & Snowball Winter Yarn Wreath by Sharon on CraftsnCoffee. She says this can be made in less than two hours.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Variegated Floss Projects in Home Decor

Super pretty spring yarn wreath made fast with a thick yarn. Sharon really knows her way around a wreath, as you can see in the DIY for this summery example also on CraftsnCoffee. She used a gorgeous variegated yarn for this…

 

 

 

 

Meanwhile, I love the striking simplicity and beauty of this idea from Laura at DuoFiberworks that combines grape vines and embroidery floss in such a unique way.

 

 

 

yarn wrapped frames behind branchCentsationalGirl has a DIY on how to create these elegant yarn-wrapped frames,

 

 

 

 

 

 

while Sarah at CrannyandMe has this tutorial on creating yarn-wrapped letters,

 

 

 

Paper Mache Yarn Bowland CarolynsHomework has simple instructions to make this yarn bowl. While these three projects look great in their solid color yarns, in the right circumstances, variegated yarns could really make these projects pop!

 

Take, for example, the tutorial to make these yarn wrapped bottles by Angelique at DIYSweetnSimple. A solid color yarn would look fine, of course, but these bottles are distinctive!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Even the kids’ versions (also from DIYSweetnSimple) look fun and fabulous!

 

 

 

 

I found this outstanding idea on BeautifulWindowDisplays from an Anthropologie store – each brick is wrapped in some kind of string or floss!

 

 

 

 

 

 

For decorating the home it would be more practical to wrap floss around brick-sized pieces of red and brown foam core or cardboard rather than full-on heavy bricks. Either way, the concept is just striking!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Variegated Floss Projects in String Art

There are a ton of string art projects out there, so I will only show you a few of my favorite tutorials, all of which could look great in variegated flosses. First is this “Heart in Ohio” DIY project on TheHarpsterHome. This particular example is for Ohio, but this could easily be modified for any other geographical mass in the world (Heart in Moldova, anyone?).

 

Another favorite is this Dream tutorial by Dina at HoneyandFitz. This is very, very fun, and I’m wondering how well that cork held up over time.

 

 

the red thread string art completeI also like this DIY by Lisa Tilse at TutsPlus Crafts.

 

 

 

 

 

variegated floss projects part 6 - rustic heart strings sting artKristi Mauws of Etsy shop RusticHeartStrings has her own unique style of string art. And I’m proud to say this piece, custom made for her client, was made with floss that she purchased from me (DMC 4068 – Camouflage)!

 

 

created at: 04/21/2012To wrap up this series of posts, I wanted to share pieces from a few artists who work in thread and yarn. First, Martin at ManMadeDIY shared this installation by Lee Baker that uses nearly 33,000 feet of colorful yarn. The link also has a video showing some of how it was set up.

 

portraits made from single thread wrapped around nails kumi yamashita (3)Next are these amazing portraits by Kumi Yamashita as seen on TwistedSifter that use thousands of brads and a single black thread. Stunning!

 

 

 

 

 

Colored Thread Installations by Gabriel Dawe thread installation color And finally, I am a big fan of Gabriel Dawe’s installations. He uses only normal sewing thread to create his translucent works. Take a look at his website to see more of his fascinating installations.

 

 

That luminescent art wraps up this Variegated Floss Projects Part 6! Are there any more examples in these crafty categories of furniture, seasonal crafts, decor, and string art that you would like to add to the comments?

Make sure you check out the whole series! Part 1 featured cross stitch, needlepoint, and embroideryPart 2 had plastic canvas, quilting, felt, sewing, and pom-pomsPart 3 covered jewelry and scrapbooking, Part 4 had knitting, spinning and dyeing, and weaving, and Part 5 had projects in crochet, lace and tatting, and basketweaving.

If you have enjoyed this series, you may want to check out my two other series to date – my four-part series on hexagon crafts and my six-part series on water-themed crafts!

Thanks, and happy crafting!

Hexagon Crafts Part 2

Welcome to Hexagon Crafts Part 2! This series on hexagon crafts should really be titled HEXIE MADNESS! Part 1 of the series covered quilting, leatherwork, scrapbooking, weaving, and jewelry. Today is the second of four posts covering hexagon crafts ranging from crochet to cakes, pottery to popsicle sticks, and everything in between.
Spit and Woodchip Hexagons

 [Spit and Woodchip Hexagons by Helle V. Fisher via Flickr]

Hexagon Crafts in Crochet

There’s a million outstanding crochet hexie patterns out there for purses, totes, blankets, table runners, rugs, hats, etc. (you name it!), and I’ve got too many favorites to feature just a few. So instead I’ll share this terrific Pinterest board by Jeannette that is full of beautiful hexie crochet tutorials and inspiration:hexagon crafts part 2 crochet tutorial pinterest board

Hexagon Crafts in Felt

This hexagonal felt flower wreath tutorial from Rachel at LinesAcross is just brilliant and beautiful, and a great way to use up felt scraps.

 

 

 

 

Hexagon Lemonade CoasterJust recently, Mollie of WildOlive posted this tutorial for an adorable hand stitched felt and fabric pitcher coaster.

 

 

Hexagon Crafts in Lace and Tatting

hexagon crafts part 2 hexagon shaped lace by herbert nieblingTo start is this knitted lace pattern by Herbert Niebling available on E-Junkie.

 

 

 

hexagon crafts part 2 - hexagon machine embroidery lace pattern from embroidery libraryWith a more modern vibe is this machine embroidery hexagon floral lace pattern available at EmbroideryLibrary,

 

 

 

 

and Advanced Embroidery Designs has this Battenberg Spiral Hexagon Lace pattern for a freestanding lace machine.

 

 

 

 

On a more handcrafted note is this gorgeous German triangle motif doily by Jeff at BridgeCityTatting. Jeff is a very talented tatter and he has created a lot of hexagonal projects. I encourage you to check out his Flickr Photostream and take a look!

 

 

 

Hexagon Crafts in Polymer Clay

hexagon crafts part 2 polypediaonline hexagon polymer clay tutorialIris at PolyPediaOnline offers this tutorial for these hexagonal bracelets that, although they look like leather, are actually made from polymer clay!

 

 

 

Intricate Kaleidoscope Cane Tutorial Cane Builder May 2013Meg at PolymerClayWorkshop offers two tutorials for making hexagonal polymer clay canes – one “easy intricate” and one plain ‘ol “intricate.”

 

 

 

I am fascinated by the amount of detail found in some of this polymer clay canework. These are a couple of beautiful examples from iKandi:
SALE - Polymer Clay Hexagon Kaleidoscope Cane Slice Bead -A37
Hexagon Polymer Clay Kaleidoscope Pin / Brooch

 

Hexagon Crafts in Origami

hexagon crafts part 2 - hexagon origami box with lidThere are tons of examples of hexagon origami – so many that I will only feature a few select links. The first, from TCGames on Instructables, is how to make a hexagonal origami box with lid. This pattern uses two pieces of paper for both base and lid, for a total of four pieces of paper.

This tutorial by Chrissy at PaperKawaii is also for an hexie origami box with lid, but this pattern only uses one piece of paper for base and one piece of paper for lid.

 

 

 

Then I found a pattern for this lovely little origami hexie flower ball on the Origami Resource Center site. It’s very cute in pastels as shown, but I wonder what it would look like in some richer colors and patterns.

 

 

 

Tricluster - FrontThen I found this collection of photos from Flickr I can only best describe as “extreme hexie origami.” There’s some amazing pieces in this mix!

 

 

 

Hexagon Crafts in Popsicle Sticks

I had totally forgotten about crafting with popsicle sticks until I saw this post from LiEr at Ikatbag. These are great fun! Her kids did a good job…

 

 

I have to admit that I saved my personal favorite for last. That basket reminds me of some crafts I did a million years ago, and now I can’t wait to try them out with some real live kids!

That cheeful note wraps up this hexagon crafts part 2. Is there anything else in these six crafty categories (crochet, felt, lace and tatting, polymer clay, origami, sticks) that you would like to add in the comments?

Make sure you’ve checked out the quilting, leatherwork, scrapbooking, weaving, and jewelry featured in Part 1, and stay tuned for hexie woodwork, pottery, painting, needlework, stained glass, gardening and much more to come!

[Update: Here’s links to Part 3 (sewing, pottery, knitting, quilling, woodworking, plastic and stained glass), and Part 4 (paint, cross stitch, embroidery, baking, lamp making, and gardening)]